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Full text of "The Tower, 1983"

RESIDENT HALLS .... 18 

ACTIVITIES 28 

ORGANIZATIONS 50 

FACULTY & STAFF ...72 
SPORTS 82 

SENIORS 

RECOLLECTIONS 128 



2 




BOOMS 

A room, a cubicle, a borne for a 
year. Many students cbose to do a 
little remodeling of the basic resi- 
dence ball room, while otbers made 
do with what was already tbere. 
Creativity was seen through A- 
frame bunks, loft beds, and shelves 
which incorporated more space. 

Accessories such as televisions, 
plants, shades, furniture, fish tanks, 
bars, and other memorabilia were 
the finishing touches. 




PEOPLE 

You see tbem everywberCf wbetb' 
er you are on aortb campus^ soutb 
campus^ in tbe union, at tbe Jibrary, 
or in passing. 

. . . People, each and everyone that 
makes up this campus. Interactions, 
with other students, before and after 
classes, or at the surrounding busin- 
esses, keep the channels open. 

Students have their own way of 
getting about. Although most walk, 
some ride bikes, other use their 
wheel chairs, and still others run. It 
is tbe getting out and moving about 
which opens up the field for interac- 
tions. 



6 




CLASSES 

There were Tuesday-Thursday 
eight o^clocks and Monday 'Wednes- 
day-Friday two o'clocksy and even a 
few iate afternoon and night ones. 

Classes, the broad spectrum, rang- 
ing from textiles in Home Econom- 
ics, microbiology in the Science 
Wing, speech in Harvey Hall, to 
economics in the Modulux. 

As we progressed further into oar 
majors, we learned valuable infor- 
mation in our classes. In some, such 
as the niches and corner HI, we 
even had first-hand experience. 

In others, such as print making, 
flat pattern, and drawing, we devel- 
oped our creative talents. 



8 




FADS AND 
FASHIONS 



Many new and different styles ap- 
peared on the Stout campus. The 
fashion crazes of stadium coats, cou- 
lottes, leotards and legwarmers for 
jazzercize, football shoes, and bright 
colors such as red and green domi- 
nated the scene. 

E.T.^ Pacman, and Ms. Pacman 
also touched our lives through 
greeting cards, music and video 
games. Even the tragic incidents of 
the Extra-Strength Tylenol deaths 
affected us. 





STUDENT 
LIFE 

Walking to class, studying in the 
iast of the summer's sun, or picnick- 
ing in the mall, Stout was our home 
for the year. 

Our weelis, which turned into 
months, and then a semester, were 
filled with many college-oriented 
activities. Such activities as meeting 
a friend for salad bar, working on a 
group project in the Fireside 
Lounge, or seeing one of the weekly 
featured films in Applied Arts, 
made Stout more than a classroom- 
lecture-note tMking institution. 




BARS 



Each one has its own atmosphere 
and setting in Menomonie^ not to 
mention its share of college busi- 
ness. The Buck, Log Jam, and JR 
Saloon went a step further to offer 
students and other residents a menu. 

Other bars with equal shares of 
business included the Spot^ Marion, 
Meet Market, the Den^ Flame 
Lounge, and the Tap. 

The bars offered an outlet away 
from the residence hall^ apartment, 
or home life. 



* 



14 





STUDENT 
CENTER 

Conveniently set, the Memorial 
Student Center^ referred to by the 
Stout community as the union, of' 
fered many services. 

Two dining areas, the snhck bar 
and the Pawn, offered a change of 
pace from the Commons or Tainter 
food services. The President*s room, 
a little more elegant, but affordable, 
was also featured. 

Conference rooms such as the Ep- 
och room, Bluedevil room, and Red 
Cedar room were places for many 
meetings. The Ballroom featured 
many events, including a career 
conference, a small business work' 
shop, dinner-theater, and a jaz- 
zertboo. 

Other services included the Print' 
ery, the bookstore, recreation cea- 
tor, and t,v. room in the basement. 





18 



Our homes. Eight separate ones, 
yet all related. The same room for 
every two^ yet all uniquely differ- 
ent. 

Full of life, books, plants, stereos^ 
televisions, and most of all, Individ' 
uality. 

Special friendships, floor parties, 
ball parties, dinner dances, commit- 
tee meetings, and countless floor 
meetings all going on throughout 
the year and enriching our lives. 

We live, grow, and establish our- 
selves as residents. 

One room amidst countless others 
in rows were developed into new 
homes. 

From time to time we all came 
together as one big family or as a 
floor family. 

The idiosyncracies we all have, 
surfaced, and we shared them 
among many new and old faces . . . 



RESIDENT HALLS 



1 




20 CKTO 




26 SOUTH 



Student life takes into account the 
everyday and everynight activities 
and involvements of Stout students. 
Classes filled the majority of our 
days and some on into the evening. 
Through these classes we met new 
faces and the aquaintances blos- 
somed into friendships. 

Our lives were centered on the li' 
brary, the union, with friends, at 
houses, at residence halls, and at the 
many local bars. These places and 
people were all a part of our indi- 
vidual . . . 

ACTIVITIES 




HOMECOMING ^ 



3r ^ 





mimmimt 



"Space-The Final Frontier" was the theme for 
the 1982 Homecoming, October 18-24. Bill Wag- 
ner and Joan Hunter, from Applied Math club, 
reigned as king and queen over the festivities. 

The week began with the royalty candidate 
couples competing against each other at the ath- 
letic field. 

Male candidates tried out their hand at cheer- 
leading, while female candidates embarked on 
an obstacle course. 

Other activities during the week included skit 
night and the coronation dance. Music entertain- 
ment at the snack bar included Pat McCurdy, 
Snopek, and Greystar. The Bluedevil football 
team climaxed the week's festivities by defeat- 
ing UW-Stevens Point. 




PAWN ENTERTAINMENT 



A quaint little dining and enter- 
tainment center with coffeehouse 
atmosphere exists on the bottom 
level of the student center: the 
Pawn. The pawn features many of 
the same menu selections as the 
snack bar. such as homemade soups, 
sandwiches, salads, and pastries. 
Sandwiches and bagels can be 
warmed in the self-service micro- 
wave. 

Entertainment by many perform- 
ers, and even local talent from the 
school and community take on the 
stage Thursday, Friday, and Satur- 
day evenings. 




J2 PAWN ENTERTAINMENT 



SNACK BAR ENTERTAINMENT 



V 



Rock to reggae. Country to comedy. The 
entertainment in the snack bar was indeed 
diverse. 

Shangoya provided the atmosphere for 
Contemporary Music Productions' annual 
beach party. Country rockers felt right at 
home with the sounds of the Ozark Mt. 
Daredevils. Comedian Alan Freed 
entertained with his crazy antics and 
strange sense of humor. 

The U.P.B. Commissions also brought such 
entertainment as Pat McCurdy and the Men 
About Town, the Flaming Oh's, Hot Jazz, 
the Mystery Band, and Ruby Star to the 
Stout Stage. 




Shangoya 



Shangoya 




Alan Freed 



Ozark Mountain Daredevils 



Ozark Mountain Daredevils 



Hot Jazz 



STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 




Time spent equalled money 
in the pocket for these Stout 
students who earned while 
they learned. Students found 
employment ranging from the 
many operations of the new 
Library Learning Center 
helping other students at the 
Student Center information 
desk. Jobs were offered in the 
areas of activities 
programming to food service. 

Learning without pay was 
also a common experience on 
the campus. Students enrolled 
in practical major classes 
received on-the-job training at 
the Niches, Corner III, and 
the day care center. 



34 STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 



INTRAMURALS 




The intramural program at 
UW-Stoul is one that allows peo- 
ple who are non-varsity to partici- 
pate in various sports according to 
their skill level This program 
helps to keep Stout students in- 
volved in exercise and recreation 
throughout the school year. 





36 INTKAMURALS 




INTRAMURALS 



WINTER CARNIVAL 




J8 WINTER CARNIVAli 





Sail the South Seas! 

The Special Events Commission planned all sorts of 
tropical fun for this year's Winter Carnival Week. 

To start off the festivities, "Yadrutas Nuf" 
(Saturday spelled backwards) brought an evening of 
coffeehouse music by Dan Bern, followed by the four- 
part harmonies of a new hot band called Hot Jazz. 
Alex Cole, comedian extraordinaire, humored his 
audience with monologues on real life and the 
evening was concluded by a performance by the 
Mystery Band, a contemporary and energetic group. 

All those competing for the crowns of Winter 
Carnival King and Queen competed in a variety of 
Winter Fun activities which were held in Nelson 
Field. Competition included snowshoe racing, 
sculpturing, snowball throwing and innertube pulling. 

King and Queen candidates vied for the title 
through the annual skit night were they, along with 
their sponsoring organizations, put on short and 
comical performances relating to the South Seas 
theme. 

An Evening In the South Seas took place in the 
Union Square. Singer/songwriter Dana Clark 
appeared in the Pawn to perform up-tempo music 
consisting of the blues, ragtime and a little bit of 
boogie. King and Queen candidates and a capacity 
crowd swayed to the reggea/calypso music of 
Shangoya. Leis and tropical attire were a prerequisite 
for this evening. 




WINTER CARNIVAL ^ 



UNIVERSITY SPEAKERS 



The University Speakers Series 
Commission was proud to join with 
SUDS (Students Undersunding 
Drinking Sensibly) and the Office of 
Student Activities to open the third 
season of the speakers series with a 
presentation by Jean Kilbourne. 

Dr. Kilbourne. who is the Assistant 
Director of the New England Screen 
Education Association, addressed a 
campus and community audience at 
8:00 p.m.. Tuesday. September 14. in 
the Harvey Hall Auditorium. Dr. 
Kilbourne is a nationally recognized 
authority on the subliminal impacts 
and uses of commercial 
advertisements. Her talk and slide 
presentation was titled. "Under the 
Influence: The Pushing of Alcohol via 
Advertising." 

Dr. Kilboume's appearance at Stout 
was a prelulde to "Alcohol Awareness 
Week" and the focus of the 
presentation was the effect of alcohol 
abuse on woman, minorities, and 
young people, and its relationship to 
self-image and self-esteem. 

On Monday evening. October 4. at 
8:00 p.m. in the Johnson Fieldhouse. 
Harvey Wasserman and Dr. Arnold 
Kramish debated what many people 
reguarded as mankind's ultimate 
question: Survivability: With the 
Arms Race? 



Both debaters are amoung the 
nation's leading authorities on nuclear 
topics and both have written 
extensively about the effects of 
atomic weapons. 

Harvey Wasserman has been an 
activist in the civil rights, anti-war. 

anti-nuclear and pro-ecology 
movements since 1973 and today is 
recognized as the best-known 
investigative reporter on the 
detrimental effecu that radiation has 
on modern civilization. His latest 
book. Killing Our Own: The Disaster 
of America's Experience with Atomic 
Radiation, has been described as "the 
best account of the crime of the 
century." 

Dr. Arnold Kramish has been 
involved with the issue of atomic 
energy and nuclear armaments since 
World War 11 and is today the 
Director of the Smithsonian Institute 
for International Studies Think Tank. 

He directed the first U.S. study of 
global fallout and has served with the 
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. He 
has also been a consultant for the 
U.S. Department of Energy. 
Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory, the Stanford Research 
Institute and Georgetown University's 
Center for Strategic and International 

Studies. 





40 UNIVERSITY SPEAKERS 




On Wednesday, December 8. at 8:00 p.m. in the Harvey HaJI 
Audilorium. Dr. Gerard K. O'Neill, a nationally-reowned professor 
of physics from Princeton University, delivered an address and 
made a slide presentation titled "2081: Our Next Century on Earth 
and in Space." 

Dr. O'Neill, who is also the president of the Space Studies Institute 
is best known for developing the concept of space colonies as a 
realistic plan within the limits of existing technology. O'Neill's 
blueprint for human colonies in space is set forth in his book. The 
High Frontier, which won the Phi Beta Kappa award as the best 
science book of 1977. 

Dr. O'Neill's most recent work in space research was widely 
circulated in 1981 in his third book. 2081: A Hopeful View of the 
Human Future. In this study he projects the major developments 
of the next century as they will affect the lives of people of alt 
nations. Using the evidence of human history and his predictions of 
technical change based on scientific reality. Dr. O'Neill prophecies 
a world not free of risk, but nevertheless exciting and rich in 
options for a better tomorrow. 




9 




On Tuesday. January IS, at 7:30 p.m. in the Harvey Hall 
Auditorium, former Marine Liet. Robert Muller delivered an 
address titled ■'Vietnam War Stories" and presented a film called 
"Heroes." 

Robert Muller, 37, is currently the executive director of the 
Vietnam Veterans of America. Mr. Muller was a 23-year-old 
Mariene Corps Lieutenant in Vietnam, leading an assault against a 
Viet Cong stronghold, when a bullet struck him in the chest and 
severed his spine. The wounds left him permanently paralyzed 
from the chest down, confined to a wheel chair for the rest of his 
life. Since then Mr. Muller has become a charismatic and eloquent 
speaker, well-known to many Americans as a result of his 
appearance on numerous television talk shows. 

"Vietnam War Stories" began with a look at our involvement in 
the Vietnam War and then focused on the world today. During the 
course of the evening, Mr. Muller took us down into the trenches 
where the war was really fought: Not only did we share the 
experiences of a Vietnam Vet, but we also confronted with him the 
moral and political questions the war has forced us to ask. 




Hunter S. Thompson, the "King of Gonzo Journalism." apoke at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Johnson Fieldhouse. Thompson first achieved recognition for his 
book. Fear and Loathing: In Las Vegas, which has become a counter- 
culture classic. His most unusual approach to writing can also be 
appreciated in Fear and Loathing: On the Campaign Trail, '7£and in his 
most recent publication. The Great Sharic Hunt. Thompson is also a 
writer exceptionale for such magazines as The Rolling Stone, Playboy. 
and The National Observer. 

Most recently, Thompson's unconventional lifestyle was the subject of 
the movie. Where the Buffalo Roam. He is also the model for the 
character "Uncle Duke." appearing in the Gary Trudeau's Doonesbury" 
comic strip. 



UNIVERSITY SPEAKERS 



SHOOTING STAR & TALAS 




A near capacity audience took to their feet in the 
Johnson Fieldhouse as Shooting Star took the stage. 
Most concert-goers remained on their feet through- 
out Contemporary Music Productions' major concert 
for 1983. 

Shooting Star proved to be a treat for heavy rock n' 
rollers of Stout, as they combined piercing guitar so- 
los, strong vocals and thundering drums into their 
performance. Some of the band's biggest hits includ- 
ed "Hollywood, "Hang on for your Life Tonight," and 
"Last Chance." 

Opening for Shooting Star was a high-voltage, 
heavy-metal rock band, Talas. From Buffalo, New 
York, the three-piece band played a brief introduc- 
tory concert, but failed to warm-up the crowd that 
awaited Shooting Star . . . 



. i 





Shooting Star 

Van McLain - lead vocals, guitarist 
Gary West - lead vocals, keyboards, 

guitarist 
Steve Thomas - drummer 
Ron Verlin - bass guitarist 
Charles Waltz - maniacle violin, 

keyboards 

Tales 

Bill Sheehan - bass 

Paul Varga - drummer 

Dave Constantino - lead guitarist 




PLAYS 




An eerie, war-damaged cathedral was the setting for 
Stout's first play of the school year, "A Sleep of Prisoners." 
Four Allied soldiers being held prisoners by the Nazis were 
given a sense of hope as they all had dreams relating to Old 
Testament happenings. This play, directed by Gerry Myers, 
constantly took the audience from dreams to realities of war. 

A six-member cast took to the stage to present Stout's first 
opperetta, "Jacques Brel is Alive and Well and Living in 
Paris." Under the direction of Natalie Bothwell and musical 
coordinator Dennis Siebenaler, these singers and dancers 
performed a show consisting of 23 songs written by Jacques 
Brel. a French artist. The songs covered every emotional 
experience: whether saddened, uplifted, disturbed or com- 
forted, members of the audience were definitely touched by 
the music. 

The newly-formed University Theatre Club chose Neil Si- 
mon's "Plaza Suite" as the organization's first student direct- 
ed play. Three separate acts took place in 719 Plaza Suite. 
The show ranged from a failing marriage to the problems of 
two high school flames getting together to a bride who 
locked herself in the bathroom on her wedding day. 

Spring has always been a time for love, so what better time 
to present "Romantic Comedy?" This play directed by Nat- 
alie Bothwell. is all about special friendships. Two play- 
wrights fall in love, but their timing is definitely out of sync. 
Love triangles form as the two finally find their way back to 
each other years later. Witty lines and emotional expression 
were combined to make this play just what the title says it is. 
a romantic comedy. 






"Come Up and See Us Sometime" was 
the theme for this year's Parents Week- 
end, that time when students and their 
parents get together to share in the busy, 
three-day' schedule put together by the 
Parents Weekend committee. Several ac- 
tivities highlighted the weekend. 

Friday evening, the Lou Johnson Or- 
chestra entertained parents and students 
with jazz-oriented danceable music. Sat- 
urday provided several options. Parents 
were invited to view the Park Front Fes- 
tival Art Display "Learning through In- 
volvement" in the Library, and all-stu- 
dent-design fashion show sponsored by 
Retail Directions, open house of all class- 
room buildings, and visiting the various 
activity booths set up in the student cen- 
ter. 

Fitting right in with the theme, a "Peo- 
ple Rodeo" was held outside. Prizes were 
awarded to participants who did the best 
in such events as "kid roping" and gunny 
sack racing. The concert band. Symphon- 
ic and Chamber Singers entertained par- 
ents and students in the fieldhouse in the 
afternoon as well. 

John Laytrec displayed feats of hypno- 
tism and mentalism Saturday night, hyp- 
notizing several members of his audience 
to prove his powers. The traditional Casi- 
no Night was held, and parents and Stu- 
dents "gambled" away their play money 
at such games as Black Jack, Lucky 7 and 
Wheel of Fortune. 

Top wrap up the weekend, an all-day 
Antique Auto Show and Swap Meet spon- 
sored by the Stout Antique Auto Club 
was held at the Dunn County Fair- 
grounds. 




PAKKNTS WKEKP:Nr) 47 




SPRING FAIR 




Once.again. the May Day Music Festival began a 
week of Spring Fair activities to Stout. From the 
Wilson Park Banshell came the music of balladeer 
Michael Johnson. His performance was laced with 
humor and sincerity. Poor Hoaward (Howard 
Stith). a six-and 12-string guitar master and 
comedian hosted the festival. Other performers 
featured were Stout student Vicki Donahue, Shar- 
on and Harry Muir, Peter Spring and Banjolemma. 
The Pawn Coffeehouse Commission sponsored the 
day of outdoor entertainment and fun. 

The comical and talented Martin & Loon Jug- 
glers entertained students passing through the 
mail area, and students displayed their artistic tal- 
ents through the abstract sidewalk chalk drawings. 

Scott Jones returned to the Stout campus and put 
forth his usual evening of excellence, a combina- 
tion of comedy and musical skill. 

Without a sound. Micah & Laura, a mime duo, 
roamed the campus mimicking passers-by. 

And to add a touch of class to the week of activi- 
ties, the Music Department and Activities Office 
brought saxophone virtuoso Larry Gwozdz to the 
Harvey Hall Stage. 






50 



We grow, aside from classes, in 
our interests. 

These interests Iceep us perpetual' 
ly involved in many happenings at 
school. Whether we are president^ 
vice president, or just a memberf we 
are part of the whole. 

We learn much about ourselves. 
Stout, and our potentials from being 
involved in . . . 

ORGANIZATIONS 




Academic Organizations 



AMERICAN ADVERTISING FEDERATION 




Providing limited ad agency- 
service to campus and community 
were the primary objectives of 
the American Advertising Feder- 
ation. Club members learned 
about the advertising industry as 
well as the AAF Regional and 
participated in the national stu- 
dent advertising competition. 





AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF PLANT ENGINEERS 1 






The Stout Student Chapter of the American Institute of Plant Engineers devoted to promotion of the field of 
Plant Engineering through speakers, field trips, and attending Twin Cities Chapter meetings. 
Plant tours included Liens, Anderson Window, and Iniernaiional Paper. 




AMERICAN SOCIETY OF INTERIOR DESIGNS l^HI 

This National organization of interior designers were provided an orientation to the professional design 
world. 

Some of the yearly highlights included a trip to Chicago Merchandise Mart. Designer Saturday in Minneapo- 
lis, and many speakers. 






APPAREL TEXTILE AND DESIGN ASSOCIATION H 

Members gained further insight into technological, educational, business and creative aspects of clothing. 




textile, and design. 

In addition, members established professional contacts and an insight into careers in the field. 

CHAMBER SINGERS H^HI^^^^^HII^^HH 


52 


The twenty-two voice choir selected both classical and contemporary musical selections. In addition to 
performing on campus, the Chamber Singers also performed in the Menomonie area and on tour. 

ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS 




Front Row L-R: Mark Heimerl, Rick Railh, Joan Dawschen. Francis Nied. 
Krisli Iverson. Second Row L-R: Dean Kovac. Rochelle Tberoux. Peggy 
JLacenski. Jim Winistorfer, Jay Prairie. 



CLUB MANAGERS ASSOCIATION 

This club consisted of students who have a common interest in country club management. Members worked 
together to gain more knowledge and experience in the club field. 



COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN 

Special Education and Vocational Rehabilitation programs were affiliated with this council. The club 
investigated new methods in Special Education as well as worked with special needs of people in the 

community. 



EPSILON PI TAU 

Epsilon Pi Tau, a fraternity which is both international and professional for Industrial Educators. Atten- 
dance for this club is at the WIEA State Teacher's Convention in Madison, 



FORENSICS 




The main objective of Stout's Forensics Club was to promote activities through speaking. These activities 
included competitive speaking and interpretation entertainment programs and community speech activities. 



RADUATE FOOD SERVICE AND NUTRITION ASSOC 



This academic organization was for graduate students. The club provided professional development exper- 
iences for graduate students in Food Service and Nutrition. 







INDUSTRIAL DESIGN SOCIETY 






Fellowship and cooperation among club members is what the Industrial Design Society promoted. The club 
also emphasized professional development within its members in the field of industrial design. 









INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CLUB 






Guest speakers, seminars, and field trips helped the club maintain a complete understanding of current 
philosophies in industry and industrial education. 

The club also provided exposure to new friends and teaching methods in education and industry. 






INTERNATIONAL FOOD SERVICE EXEC. ASSOC. 



The club aided members in broadening perspectives of the hospitality industry through catering seminars, 
demonstrations, and field trips. 



ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS S. 



Mathematics Club 

Interaction between faculty, students and industry professionals in the fields of Applied Mathematics and 
Computer Sceince was promoted by this club. 



American Institute For Design And Drafting 




This professional club focused on 
design and drafting related areas in 
the industry today. 

The club provided its members tech- 
nical information for improving the 
science of graphic communication and 
design as well as fostering a spirit of 
fellowship among its members. 



Menomonie Assoc. For Tiie Ed. Of Young Children 

Members of this club, which were Early Childhood Education majors, were assisted in the lives of children 
to better understand the needs of children. 



Nutrition And Foods Association 

Current issues of nutrition, food science, and health were topics discussed at this professional organization. 
NFA sponsored Nutrition Week. WDA Conference, and Continuing Education Conference. 



Phi Upsilon Omicron 




Front Row L-R: Jim Vegel. TomAnoszko. TimKilness. Todd Zimmer 
man. Gary EasUund. Second Row L-R: Tom VanderJoop. Craig Mader 
Dean Amundson. David Zeier. Scott Segner, Tim Peterson. Jin 
McCracken. Third Row L-R: Mark Byer. Dave Gearing. Chris Bau 
mann. Mark Renard. Steve Widmer. Kirk Nick. Fourth Row L-R 
Keith Jantz. Michael Malzahn. Bob Reischl. Greg Eick. Frank Loren 
zen. Gil Blomdahi. Jeff Wachier. 





Phi Upsilon Omicron is a National Home Economics professional honor society recognizing and encouraging 
professional growth of its members and to be of service to the profession. 




Restaurant And Tavern Management Association 

RTMA expanded students knowledge of the hospitality industry through interaction with professionals in 
the industry. Other highlights of the year's events included field trips, speakers and working in the different 

operations. 



54 ACADEMIC ORGANIZATIONS 




Society For The Adv. Of The Tourism Industry 



This particular club explored educational, professional and recreational levels of tourism by meeting and 
visiting key people and places in the tourism industry. 




Society Of Manufacturing Engineers 



Members of the Society of Manufacturing En^neer^ learned new technologies in manufacturing. 




Society Of Packaging And Handling Engineers 



Knowledge and awareness of opportunities in the packaging industry were presented to members in this 
club. 




Stout Council On Family Relations 



Stout Council on Family Relations was affiliated with the National Council on Family Relations. The club 
provided its members opportunities to exchange ideas and concerns regarding family life, participate in 
lectures and conferences and community involvement opportunities within the Menomonie area. 




Stout Home Economics Association 



The Stout Home Economics Association promoted professional development of Home Economics students. 
The development was done by focusing on the needs of people and making positive steps to help meet their 
needs. 




Stout Honor Society 



This elite society promoted intellectual curiosity and a good attitude of campus scholarship. Members must 
maintain a 3.75 cumulative average. 




Stout Marketing And Sales 



The Stout Marketing and Sales Club fostered scientific study and research in the field of marketing and 
research. The club also provided educational opportunities for its members to enhance their understanding of 
the principles of marketing. 




Academic Organizations 5'. 



Stout Student Education Association 



Monthly meetings of this dub have its members listen to professional speakers and work with teachersand 
perspective teachers committed to improving education. ActiviUes varied which also helped members learn 

about education. 



Stout Typographical Society 

Being an academic organization, the Stout Typographical Society was also a Graphic Arts organization for 
Industrial Technology and Industrial Education majors. The club helped the majors develop a professional 
attitude toward the printing industry. 



Home Economics In Business 




Key areas of Home Economics 
ID Business were explored by the 
club. The club also sSsowed its 
members what was available in 
the field of liome ec in business. 

Annual fieldtrips to companies 
related to the major were spon- 
sored by the club. Election of offi- 
cers is held in February and in- 
stallation takes place in May. 



Student Construction Association 

The construction industry was studied in this club through guest speakers, seminars, and field trips. 



Symphonic Singers 

This academic as well as Choral organization consisted of mixed voices. The singers performed large choral 
works for the Stout community. 



University Ciioir 

The University Choir consisted of women. The Choir performed music of all types and periods. 



Vocational Reliabilitation Club 

The Vocational Rehabilitation Club promoted knowledge and awareness of rehabilitation, acceptance of the 
handicapped, and a barrier-free environment of all 





Front Row L-R: Marv Gianisching. Second Row L^R: Maria Houiz. Patti 
Hani. Jill Rolland. Tami Kosbab. Third Row L-R: Lisa Cumow. Rosemary- 
Wolf. Suzanne Shaw. Susan Deal. Cathy Heil. Barb Hill, Lynn Curnow. 
Simonne Wysockey. Fourth Row L-R: Barb Sachse. Cindy Schwartz. Dr. 
Judy Opperl. Dr. Mary Thompson. 





ansa* 







■■■■■■■I^^^^^^^^H University Concert Band 






This performing organization provided an outlet for talented instrumentalists. The band also promoted the 
contmuation of the Performing Arts on campus, yep oana enteriammem v/asproviueu uy uic uanu at aci/icc/*, 
eve/Its. 






HB^^I^^^H^IH^Hir University Jazz Ensemble 

Big band style music was performed by these talented instrumentalists. 






ActiviTy M^rograuiiiiiiig \ 






^^HHHHHIHilHI contemporary Music Productions 






Thic nreraniysitinn madp uD of sthctlv volunteer studcnts provided a variety of musical concerts as well as 
dances throughout the academic school year. 






IIBII^^I^^^^^H^^H^^^^H Foreign Film 

International film works was presented by this organization to the Stout campus. The club helped increase 




people's awareness of film as a powerful means of artistic expression. 

^^^^^^^■^^^^^^^■^^^H^^^^l Anier-Mtesioence mmhii i^uuiicji 






IRHC was the legislative body which governed students living in the residence halls. 
Some of the yearly highlights included the Spring Banquet. Parent's Weekend, special dmners, energy 
conservaUon contests, concerts, speakers, and recreation tournaments. 






^^^H^mi^^^l^^^^H^^^^^H Parents Weekend 

This particular organization promoted and produced Stout's annual Parent's Weekend Activities. 






I^^HIHIHH^^^^I Pawn Coffeehouse Commission 






Professional and student folk music entertainment in the Student Center Pawn was sponsored by this 






organization. , ,,_ . - ■ .u 
jPntovtainmfint ivpc nrp<;pnted everv weekend of the school year. Also sponsored by the commission was the 

May Day Music Fest. 






j^H^m^mil^HI Performing Arts Commission 

The goal of the commission was to enhance student awareness of the fine arts, including the annual dinner 
theater. 





Activity Programming 



Publicity For Programming Commission 



This organization assisted in the promotion of activities sponsored by the commissions of the University 
Programming Board. 



Recreation Commission 



Recreation commission sponsored a variety of recreational opportunities for the campus. The commission 
also supported the development and operation of club sports. 



Hotel Sales Management Association 




HSMA devoted much of its energy 
organizing and participating in ho- 
tel sales programs and blitzes, meet' 
ing sales personnel and visiting var' 
ious hotel properties in the mid- 
west. Along with these activities, 
the club participated in the Hospi- 
tality Conference in the spring and 
the Career Conference in the fall. 

Through this organization, active 
HSMA members acquired actual ho- 
tel sales experience, added to their 
repertoire of professional contacts, 
gained leadership and organization- 
al skills, and increased profession- 
alism. 



Special Events Commission 




Major campus activity programs were planned, promoted and produced by the Special Events commission. 
These events included Homecoming. Winter Carnival, and Spring Fair. 



University Cinema 

Assortment of films, such as "Arthur", "On Golden Pond. " "Superman II " "Star Trek 11. " "Cassablanca. 
and "Taps", were provided to Stout students by the cinema club. 



University Programming Board 

The University Programming Board was a coordination body of the eight main campus program commis- 
sions and publicity for activities commission. The board was also responsible for campus activities supported 
by the Student Activity Fee. 





Front Hou- L-R: Chris Chantler. Mary Young, Tbys Jones. Monica Plum- 
mer. Kirk Kamish. Second Row L-R: Mark McNeany. Linda Malone, 
Janet Sheedy. Cindy Fleming. Mary Mueller. Third Row L-R: Rob Jacob- 
son. Steve Durst. Chris Zabel. Murphy Schwandner. Kim PriU. MarieUen 
King. Fourth Row L-R: Mark Hennen. Terry Greenfield, Karen Bouwer, 
Marc Kaufman. Sandra Hu. Fifth Row L-R: Mark Thompson. Renee 
Trzcbiatowski. Cindy Oliver. Beth Jueneman. Linda Eaton. Quandee 
Semrow. Sixth Row L-R: Jeff Hazen. BobMoran, Lance Schaefer. Janene 
McBride. Ondy Miller. Seventh Row L-R: Gary Larson. EUhu Wear. 
Larry Rector. CUff Ganger. Tony Rondinelii. Jerry Ferguson. Cori Hop- 
kins. 





58 ACTIVITY PROGRAMMING 



University Spealcer Series 



The Speaker series developed and produced a year-long series of speakers. The speakers aimed at enforcing 
the student's interest and awareness of issues concerning today's world. 



University Theater Club 



The University Theater Club promoted awareness and participating by providing a series of theatrical 
productions throughout the school j^-ar. 



Community Service 




Campus A A 



Campus AA aimed at helping students and other alcoholics to achieve sobriety and to stay sober. 



Circle K 

The college chapter of Kiwanis helped its fellow man. Projects included volunteer work for Bloodmobile and 
other community related projects. 



Gay Community At Stout 



CCS. provided counseling, social and educational services for the gay community. The Gay community 
also had informational services for the community in general. 



Project Friendsliip 



Members of Project Friendship included volunteer students working with young children of Menomonie 
and the surrounding area. Members provided group activities for children who needed this type of experience. 



Stout Collegiate 4-H Club 

Stout collegiate 4-H club continued growth through promoting 4-H. its leadership and social activities. 



^^B^^MStudents Understanding Drinlcing Sensibly 

They also sponsored a wide variety of alcohol education programs to the Stout campus. 



Community Service 5 



WVSS Radio 

The radio station served the campus and surrounding area with a wide variety of music and public service 
broadcasting. 



[Greek Organizations 



Alpha Phi Omega Fraternity 




This fraternity coordinated the Bloodmobile on campus and worked with the elderly and the Boy Scouts in 
the Menomonie community. 



Alpha Phi Sorority 

Alpha Phi was a social sorority. The purpose was the promotion of growth in character, unity of feeling, 
sisterly affection and social communion among its members. 



Chi Lambda Fraternity 

A social fraternity, Chi Lambda developed "brotherhood" among its members. The fraternity also partici- 
pated in campus activities. 



I Inst. Of Electrical & Electronic i£ngineers 



This particular club was composed 
of the Electronics Club and Computer 
Society. The groups promoted dialogue 
among students with interests in elec' 
tronic or computer related fields. 



Delta Zeta Sorority 

Delta Zeta was a national sorority. The purpose of the sorority was developing friendship and individual 
personal growth among its members. 








From Row L-R: Martin Stone, Denny Ruff. Second Row L-R: Gerry 
Koehler. Steve Larson. Greg PoreU, Marshall Frey. Doug'DuQuaine. 
DaveScrchen. Pat Postell. Scott Masking. Rick Enz. Dr. Robert Spinti. 




GREEK ORGANIZATIONS 




Gamma Sigma Sigma 



Gamma Sigma Sigma participated in service in the community, on campus and national service projects. 



Inter-Greek Council 

This particular organization united all Greek Organizations on the Stout campus. It provided coordination 
among activities sponsored by these groups. 



Kappa Lambda Beta 



Kappa Lambda Beta provided many functions. Among its members it promoted friendship and leadership 
with its officers. Academic excellence was required for the fraternity and participation in campus activities. 



Panbellenic Council 



The council was a governing body for all on-campus national sororities. The council also helped plan 
activities which involved the sororities. 



Phi Omega Beta Fraternity promoted fellowship and "brotherhood" among its members. 



Religious Organizations 




Cliristian Science Organization 



Students in this organization learned about Christian Science and applied these science principles in their 
daily lives. 



Fellowstiip Of Cliristian Athletes 



The Fellowship of Christian Athletes confronted coaches and athletes with the message of Christ in hope 
that through their examples others may be led to the Lord. 



Lutheran Collegians 

This religious organization was a Wisconsin Synod college group which met weekly for Bible study and 
group activities. 



Religious Organizations 6 



Ministry To UW-Stout 



The Ministry represented and served UW-Stout in the name of Catholic, Lutheran. Methodist, Congrega- 
tional, Episcopal. Baptist, United Church of Christ and Presbyterian churches. 



Muslim Association Of Stout Students 

M.AS.T provided religious and educational information to students interested in Islam. 





Pentecostal Youth Encounter 

This organization provided students with the opportunity to know and serve Christ through studying God's 
word in the scriptures and to share spiritual experiences. 



Special Interest Organizations 



Alfresco Outing Club 




Outdoor recreational activities such as backpacking the Porcupine Mountains. White water canoeing and 
rafting, cross country skiing, bike trips, rock climbing, and spring break backpacking in Arizona highlighted 
Alfresco' s year. 



Committee On A Progressive Environment 



C.O.P.E.. which this special interest club was better known as. reviewed and recommended residence hall 
policies. The club raised student awareness concerning alcohol use and responsible community living in 
looking for alternatives and responsible innovations in residence hall life. 



Stout Management Society 



SMS provided guest speakers 
and tours as educational exper^ 
ieace for the members prepar- 
ing for management positions 
in the field of Business. Career 
Conference, held each fall, was 
organized by SMS. 




From Row L-R: Rob Burtch. Jeff Fields. Aggie Miller. Scan Longiin. Jay 
Prairie. Second Row L-R: Sandy Anderson. Keith Firari, Pete Kreuser. Chris 
Hefty, Stacey Stener, Scott Bailey. Nancy Rockman, Keith Keinholz. Lisa 
Gust. Patty Goodnetter. 



62 SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



Retail Directions 




Executive Board Front Row L-R: DeeDee Stcib. LynDeile Skoglund. Lynn Ritter. 
Dee Jezwinski. Michelle Fox. Second Row L-R: Kristi Kukuk. Lori Rausch. Chris 
Bockhop. Tori Olson. Kendra Ploen. 



Retail Directions was an 
o rga n iza tion design ed to 
provide opportunities for 
students to become involved 
witii representatives of busi- 
ness and industry and activi- 
ties related to the retail busi- 
ness. 

Members were challenged 
to explore all facets of a re- 
tailing career. Guest speak- 
ers, educational field trips 
and fashion events helped 
members look more closely 
into the retailing career. 



^^^Bi^^^^B^^^^^B^MI^^^MB Ebony Harambee 

Ebony Harambee provided educational experiences allowing the Stout campus to gain awareness of the 
Black culture. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^M Fine Arts Association 

Members included in the association were interested in the Fine Arts and expanded their interest. 




Hisponos Club 



Hisponos provided support for its members. The goal of the club was to expand awareness of the Hispanic 
culture. 



Nigerian Students Association 



The association acted as a forum for dissemination of information and cooperation among Nigerians in the 
United States. They fostered unity among themselves and other students both culturally and socially. 



I^^I^^^^^^^HI Prometheus - Creative Arts Journal 

This special interest group promoted creativity in literature and an through publication and cash prizes. 



SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 6- 



stout Ski Club 

Weekend and weeknight ski trips were planned by the ski club. The dub interested both recreational skier 
and racer. 



Stout Striders 



This group promoted health via running and jogging. 




Stout Weight Training Club 




The weight training club provided an opportunity for students to learn and experience the various aspects 
of weight training. 



Women In Management 



Worn en in Management ex- 
plored key issues wb icb fa ce 
women as tbey prepare to eater 
the field of professional manage- 
ment. Each month different 
speakers spoke on specific sub- 
jects. Tbe club was open to all ma- 
jors and met twice a month on 
Monday evenings in tbe Judicial 
room of tbe student center. 




From Row L-R: Sheila Maloney, Lori Martin. KaUe Counney. Jan Lund- 
quist. Jane Scharmach. Lisa Jaqua. Second Row L-R: Sharon BrauU. Caro- 
lyn Natvig, Stephanie Earp, Edna Kawakami. Nancy Hougard. Chris Graf. 
Third Ron- L-R: Shelly Corcoran. Ellen Matt. Linda Truedell. Joan Hagan. 
Rita Witzig. Sue Ace. Melinda Wagner. Cathy Kim. Cheryl Sobczak. 



Stout Yoga Assembly 




A better understanding of yoga was promoted by the yoga assembly. It assisted members in attaining 
physical, emotional and social well being. 




Stout Karate Club 

The art of self defense was learned by students in the karate club. Students were also demonstrated the 
proper techniques. 



SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



UW-Stout Frisbee Club 

The frisbee dub, also known as the 'discateers.' played different frisbee games against other clubs and 
schools. 




Swim Club 

The swim club worked with students who were interested in competitive swimming. 




Unicycle Club 



Unicycle enthusiasts had an opportunity to display their skills and talents while entertaining the general 
public in this club. 




International Relations Club 



Front Row L-R: Sharon Pederstuen, Emmannuel O. Onwuka. Sec- 
ond Ro\\- L-R: John Jamok. Lana Francis. Ceoiram Ramsamooj. 



The purpose of IRC was to encourage 
friendly relationships among students, 
members of faculty and the community. 

The club also helped students meet 
people who are well informed on issues 
of international importance. 

As an orientation agency, IRC helped 
incoming international students. 



UW-Stout College Republicans 




Wcollege republicans were informed on political issues that may effect them 




UW-Stout Folk Dance Club 

Students participated in and learned about folk dancing of all types. 





UW-Stout Veterans Club 


This organization of veterans had the purpose of uniting 
issues. 


them and helping them become a ware of veteran 's 



SPECIAL IN'TEREST ORGANIZATIONS 6S 



The Stoutonia 



The main purpose behind the 
Stoutonia was to inform stu- 
dents and faculty of campus 
events, news on the local, state 
and national level, sports and 
entertainment features. All ar- 
ticles were written and edited 
by the students of UW-Stout 
who were members of the 
newspaper staff. 

The paper was divided up 
into various editorial positions 
with the top being editor-in- 
chief followed by entertain- 
ment, news, photography, ad- 
vertising, production and copy 
editing. All the positions had 
staffs underneath them. A fac- 
ulty member from the English 
department served as adviser. 
Special supplementary issues 
such as the Family, Christmas, 
and April Fools issue were fea- 
tured. 




Front How L-R: Joni Lenius. Pat Murphy. Gail Koeske. Second Row L-R: 
Robbie Miller. Kristi Iverson. Mary DuCharme. Jane Murphy. Rochelie Ther- 
oux. Sue Jochims. Kim Steen. Peggy Lacenski. Third Row L^R: Renee Ritchie. 
Julie Briedenstein. Nancy Gullans, Cheryl Sobczak. Mike Moher. Sue Krause. 
Fourth Row L-R: Grace Spiliane. Cindy Schwartz. Sea! Daly. Britt Keller. 
Howard Foreman. Sheila Gahler. Michelle Gander. Kathy Niederberger. Fifth 
Row L-R: Kristin Hilliker. Cathy Walker. Tim Cole. Doug Kohl. Jody Jacobson. 
Dick Govier. Jim Keyes. Dave Fredrickson. 



UW- Stout Women 's Fast-Pitch Softball 




This Softball league provided Stout women with a fast-pitch Softball team which promoted softbaU as a 
means of competition, recreation, fellowship, and fitness. 



Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority 



A national social service so- 
rority, Sigma Sigma Sigma was 
the Beta Pi Chapter of Tri Sig- 
ma. The philanthropy is the 
Robbie Page Mem orial for 
which they had fundraisers 
such as "Make a Child Smile 
Week". Profits of fundraisers 
were given to Play Therapy 
programs in children's hospi- 
tals. 

On the social side, Sigma Sig- 
ma Sigma had a formal Christ- 
mas dance. Spring dance, and 
socialized with each of the fra- 
ternities. 




Front Row L-R: Kathy Jahn. Ellen Weaver. Amy Svoboda. Mary Dunlap. 
Second Row L-R: Pam Severson, Janie Pribyl. Jane Waage, Can Pellegrini. 
Deb Galay. Third Row L-R: Toni Jensen. Linda Bhsson. Brenda Hager. Connie 

Traxel. Nancy Dietzen. Diane Anthony. Julie Knutson. Lisa Maxwell. 



66 SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



^H^^^^^^^^l Inter-Varsity ChrL 


stian Fellowship 


> 






A Qondenom ina tiona I 
group, Inter-Varsity 






Christian Fellowship 
helped students grow in 
the love of Christ, their 
Christian faith, and ser- 
vice to other. 




Fronz Ho;v L-R: Wendy Thomas, Cassandra Wilson. John Knvtson, Warren Cook. 
Polycarp Xyrahule. Bill Koroeschell, Dave Thompson. Dave Fredrickson. Gregg 
Hegle. Second Row L-R: Tom Trihers. Mark Schindler. Sheila Smith, Karen Ruder. 
Heidi Olson. Cindi Wieman. Melanie McKee. Rowann Prell. Donna Dumas. Jane 
Banke. Cheryl Peters, Barb Knutson. Third Row L-R: Leanne Hammerstein. Cara 
Seppe, Wynne Woosley. Diane Wayzny. Sandy Zahler. Sue Todd. Sandy Wazny. 
Karen Walsh, Marsha Enfield. Dave Chizek. Steve Kissinger. Wayne George. Laurie 
Chilvers. Lori Hoard. Lisa Haugen. Gary Cowles, Tim Ready. Kim Lalbright. Nathan 
Lalbright. Lauretta Hoover. Fourth Row L-R: Michelle Krier. Tony Sjolander. Mike 






Frtiz. Joe! Walde. Bruce Kissinger. Holly Krueger. Julie Ryan. Ernie Brown. Karen 
Nistler. Julie Wright. Brian Hairdahl, Craig Novak. Steve Woodgate. Sue Egerdai. 
Eric Bartz. Janet Riebe. James Jordan. Marsha Wilson, Leo Spychalla, Derrick 
Bretta, Dave Johnson. Jim Banister. Cindy Meyers. 


It 


m 's Volleyball C 


lub 


1 This club provided men of Stout the opportunity to participate in 


a higher level of power volleyball 



Boxing Club 




Front Row L-R: Mike Carlson. Art Johnson. Bob Blersch. Second Row L-R- Doug 
Jaeger, Scott MUIer. Steve Scbutt. Steve Exner. Ron Sielaff. 



Boxing Club provided 
students the opportunity to 
learn the sport of boxing 
and to keep a continued in- 
terest in the sport with 
competition through the 
year. 



SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



Stout Student Association 



The purpose of the Uni- 
versity St u den t senate is 
four fold. First it provides 
representation for student's 
principles, desires, and in- 
terests. It insures major cam- 
pus group representation 
which is determined by 
number, area, and dynamics. 
It provides students with an 
opportunity to learn govern- 
mental procedures where 
the responsibility is vested 
in the people. Finally, it de- 
velops a system which will 
delegate its responsibility 
among its members and in- 
sure that the SSA remains 
one government. 



Distributive Education Class Of America 



Members were exposed and 
familiarized with a national 
organization dealing with mar- 
keting and distributive educa- 
tion. Career development con- 
ferences and leadership were 
participated by each of the 
members. 





From Row L-R: Jodi Hutkowski. Michelle Larson. Jenny Johnson. Mary Ellen 
McKearn. Second Row L-R: Sam Wood. Grace Kasel. Kirsten Johnson. Pam Huff- 
man. Todd Trautmann. Pam Severson. Pai Cosgrovc. Mike Wing. Bill Perry. 
Denni.'? Knoble. Third Row L-R: Scott Velishek. Kris Bolstad. Mike Stiever. Mary 
Jo Wiitman. Elaine Wur^ier. Alison Elert. Ellen Weaver. Sharon Myrum. BiL 
O'Neill. Fourth Row L-R: Dan Hansen. Jim Wollman. DtiWayne Senning. Tom 
Carlisle. Jeff Ehckson. Fifth Row L-R: Dan Hansen. Bob Schams. Mike Ward. 




6« SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



il 



Rugby Club 




Rugby Club provided students with the opportunity to experience the game against other midwest rugby 
clubs. The club plays two separate seasons a year: spring and fail. TheStout team played against teams from 
Eau Claire, Stevens Point and LaCrosse as well as teams from Minnesota. 




Front Row L-R: Brady Benson. Kevin GaUager. Sara Bancroft. Sue VondreH. Karen 
Hanson. LeeMollan. Second Row L-R: Renae Carson. Tyonongu Akume. Ron Belz. Erik 
Meyer. Pat Deuberry. Mike Jacobson. Jim Lee, Tim Walsh. 



Soccer Club 



The Stout Soccer Club 
was student run by an 
executive committee. 
The team played other 
colleges in a fall out- 
door season and a win- 
ter indoor season. Ev- 
eryone that joined had a 
chance to play. 

The club was made up 
of two teams. Each team 
practiced five times a 
week for a minimum of 
two hours. 



Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity 




From Row L-R: Jeff Diebl. Fritz Rushlow. Rohan Forkner. Mike Shepard. Ron Flagel. 
Mike Wing. Second Row L-R: Dan l^wler. Marty Trvcco. Greg MacDonald. Todd Ehret. 
Dewey Rothenng. Mark Pelnar. Jesse Hughes. John Coulet. Rod Hustad. Dave Sax. Gary 
Leinwander. Tim Sachsc. Third Row L-R: Paul Rushlow. Chuck VanHorn. Jeff Tibbitts. 
Chris Kvranz. Paul Henzlik. 



A national social 
fra terni ty, S igm a 
Tau Gamma was 
founded at UW-Stout 
in 1946 and was char- 
tered as Alpha Kappa 
Chapter of Sigma 
Tau Gamma on No- 
vember 20, 1948. 

Special events in- 
cluded Carriage 
House parties, brat 
fries, parents week- 
end, dinner dance, 
and other social ac- 
tivities. The fraterni- 
ty aimed at the total 
development of its 
members in leader- 
ship, social interac- 
tion and personal 
growth. 



SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



m 



UW-Stout Football/Basketball Cheerleaders 



The Football/Basket- 
ball cbeer-stuttt squad pro- 
moted pep and enthusiasm 
at both football and bas- 
ketbaii games. The squad 
consisted of eight girls and 
eight guys with an alter- 
nate for each. Partner 
stunts, gymnastics, and 
group mounts were the ba- 
sis of the cheer'Stunt 
squad, along with side- 
line chants and group 
cheers. In hopes for Blue 
Devil victories, the squad 
was present at all home 
games and traveled to 
away games as often as 
possible. 




Front Row L-R: Bob Fimreiie. Linda Koch, Jan Erickson. Debme Simmons. Sec- 
ond Row L'R: Danielle Anderson. Mark Delnar. Dena Ackerson. Scott Vollmer. 
Lori Schaap. Randy Miller. Peggy Planton. Third Row L-R: Marv Kay Schiller. 
Paul Laderhose. Brenda Fangmeier. Mick Hager. Fourth Row L-R: Rohan 
Farkner, Karen Drache. Gregg Bartel. 



UW-Stout Hockey Cheerleaders 



Eight girls compro- 
mised the squad. The 
first part of the season 
was spent traveling and 
getting lost. The second 
part of the season was 
cheering at home 
games. New uniforms 
were also purchased! 




Front Row L-R: Theresa Radermeeler. Sue Nelson. Lori Madsen. Rene Derks. Ann 
Drier. Jacki Jensen. Wendy Reilly. 



70 SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



mam 



UW-Stout Pom Pom Squad 



' ^^^^ 




Front Row L-R: Mary Ann Barlon. Gina DiCnsio. Jeanne Siuth. Susie Sprages. Jamie 
Ginlher. Kathy Haas, Diane Oja. Second Row L-R: Kathie Hamerski. Diane Boemke. 
Michele Kilinski, Patty Bechard, Sandy Amtson, Kim Giertz. Karen Buelow. Third 
Row L-R: Julia Bentz. Jamie Hanseder. Judy Sponem. Julie Block. Tracy Fujko. Pam 
Williams. Liz Knulson. 



Halftimes were livened 
up by the entertainment 
provided by the support- 
ive and enthusiastic UW- 
Sto u t Pom Pom sq uad. 
The squad worked dili- 
gently perfecting the cre- 
ative dance routines per- 
formed during Blue Devil 
football and basketball 
games. Inviting high 
school pom pom squads 
and dancelines from Wis- 
consin and Minnesota, the 
squad held the annual 
pom pom clinic. High 
schoolers came to learn 
and compete. 




UW-Stout Wrestling Cheerleaders 



Front Row L-R: Chris Bockhop. Second Row L-R: Lynn Riemer. 
Third Row L-R: Carrie Rux. Fourth Row L-R: Ranei Johnson, 
Vicki Lorenlson. Monica Hauge. Fifth Row L-R: Renee Kohln- 
hofer. Sixth Row L-R: Molly Fisher. 



Much of the school spirit shown for the 
Blue Devil wrestling team could be 
pinned to this group of eight cheer- 
leaders. Whether at home and at away 
meets, Blue Devil fans never bad to 
"wrestle" with the thought of who was 
backing the team. 



SPECIAL INTEREST ORGANIZATIONS 



Aiding students with their studies 
were the competent members of the 
UWStout faculty and staff. Besides 
taking practical major courses^ stu- 
dents were able to take advantage of 
faculty and staff members* knowU 
edge and experience. Many of the 
men and women of the various de» 
partments come directly from the 
field of industry, technology, busi' 
ness and home economies. Pictured 
is Dean of Students and Assistant 
Chancellor for Student Services 
Samuel Wood. 



FACULTY & STAFF 




APPAREL, TEXTILES 
AND DESIGN 



First Row L-R: Dr. Kenneth Heintz, 
Glenyce Peterson. Dr. Mary Welch. 
Susan Davis. Dorothy Jensen. Karen 
LaBat. Eileen Laurino. Carol Hillmer. 
Erma Jean Jackie. Second Row L-R: 
Wray Lamb. Paul Zerlslrom, Dr. Rita 
Mahan. Richard Hoffman. Dr. Carol 
Sieweri. Dr. Donna Albrecht, Dr. Marcia 

Metcalf. 




ART 

First Row L-R: Humphrey Gilbert. 
Robert Price. Eddie Wong. Patricia 
Zonlelli. Second Row L-R: Todd Boppel. 
John Perri. Dion Manriquez. E)ouglas 
Gumming. Charles Wimmer. Janet 
Danek. Third Row L-R: Timothy 
Nessler. Paul DeLong, Ronald Verdon. 
William Schulman. James McCormick. 
Fourth Row L-R: John Zellner, Gene 
Bioedorn, Chairman. Claudia Smith. Alan 
Gamache. Sherman Iverson. 



BIOLOGY 

First Row L-R: Dr. Luther Mahan. Dr. 
Gene Olson. Dr. Russell James, Cheryl 
Dado. Peggy McMartin. Dr. Donald 
Dickmann. Second Row L-R: Dr. 
Richard Wilson. Phillip Gilliland. George 
Nelson, Dr. Oscar Carlson. Dr. Edward 
Lowry. Dr. Douglas Wikum. 




74 FACULTY AND STAFF 





BUSINESS 

First Row h-R: Jack GanzemillK", 
TimoUiy Peterson, Robert Behling, Ala 
Curry, Elaine Fitzgerald. Second Row 1 
R: Wiliiam Knutson, Theodore Lloyd, 
Maureen Munger, Stanley Johnson, Dr. 
Bruce Siebold, Chairman, George 
Morrison, Wayne Nero, Gail Wolbert, 
Secretary. 



CHEMISTRY 

First Row L-R: Ellen Carlson, Secretary. 
Second Row Lr-R: Edward Gold, Teresa 
Hastings, Dr. Susan Murrenbem. Dr. 
Martin Andrus. Dr. William Mueller, 
Chairman. Third Row t-R: Dr. Gerald 
Zimmerman. Dr. Robert Etoerr, Dr. 
William Wa^er. 



COUNSELING AND 
PSYCHOLOGICAL 
SERVICES 

First Row L-B: Maribeth Kasik, Dr. 
David Cook, Dr, Carlyle Gilbertson, Dr. 
Calvin Stoudt, Lee Morical. Second Row 
L-R; Dr. Robert Wiertz, Dr. John 
Deutschep, Dr. Charles Barnard, E^. 
Gust Jenson. 



FACULTY AND STAFF 




EDUCATION AND 
PSYCHOLOGICAL 
SERVICES 

First. Row L-R: Tom Allen. 
Richard Halmstad. Jitl Stanton. 
Dr. John Houlc. Dr. Virginia 
Peter. Jean Breisch. Second 
Row L-R: Dr. Eugene Flug. Dr. 
Thomas Franklin. Barbara 
Sedgwick. Dr. Mary Hopkins- 
Best. Dr. Reinhard Schmidt. 
Harlyn Misfetdl. Dr. Mary 
Raines. Dr. Lorry Sedgwick. Dr. 

Dennis Bolsiad. 



ENERGY & 
TRANSPORTATION 

First Row L-R: Dr. Thomas Baldwin. 
Chairman. Dr. Robert Spinti. Second 
Row L-R: Edward Morical. Dr. Jack 
Sampson. Dr. James CoMier. Dr. Jonas 
Amoapim. Third Row L-R: Thomas 
Prescott. Dr. Joe Rinck. Dr. Don 
Olson. 



ENGLISH 

First Row L-R: John Medeiman. 
Carole Flint. Richard Gardner. Dr. 
Susan Thunn, Helen Qumn. Dr, 
Evelyn Jenson. Second Row L-R: Dr. 
Janet Polansky. Sylvia Gengenbach. 
Pal McManamy, Howard Foreman. 
Dr. David McCordick. Marv Jo 
Ralhke. Ray Barlow. Third Row i.-R: 
Paul Edmondson. Morrcll Solem. 
Robert Moran. Chairman. William 
O'Neill. Claudia Kinville. Dr. Michael 
Levy. Jeannv House. 







11 1 
1 j^fcj * 



76 FACULTY AND STAFF 






FOOD AND 
NUTRITION 

First Row L-R: Bouy Viens. 
Choryl Bork. Dr. Mercedes 
Kainski, Dr. Margaret James. 
Second Row L-ft: Andrea 
Dillaway. Dr. Mary Ann 
Townscnd, Ayse Ceylan. Gladys 
E^rl. Dr. Lorraine Dahlke. Janice 
Nelson. Dr. Anita Wilson. Dr. 
Jacqueline Reddick. 



GRAPHIC 

COMMUNICATIONS 

First Row L-R: Daniel Malenke. 
Gary Cowles, James Tenorio. Dr. 
James Herr. Courtney Xysiuen. 
Second Row L-R: Robert 
Hendricks. Scott Simenson. John 
Vranak. Dr. Louis Moegenburg. Dr. 
William Amthor. Dr. Lon Sterry. 
Thomas Vandorloop. Third Row L- 
R: James McCracken. William 
Andy Bear. Dr. Charles Thomas. 
Dr. Hans Timpcr. Dan Massopust 



HABITATIONAL 
RESOURCES 

First Row L-R: Carol Stuckert. 
Secretary. Teresa Schulz. Dr. 
Judy Oppert. Gail Misfeldt. Beth 
Schlagel. Second Row L-R: Dr. 
Charles Metelka. James 
Buer germeister. Thomas 
Phillips. Dr. Leiand NichoUs. 
Sluart-FuUarton. Reed Andrae. 
William Way. Jafar Jafari. 



FACULTY AND STAFF 



mm 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, 
FAMILY LIVING & 
COMMUNITY 
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES 

First Row L-R: Brook Skinner, Denise 
Skinner. Paula Noll. Judith Gifford. James 
Huber. Dr. Priscilla Resting. Diane 
Fleming. Judith Kirk. Connie Weber. 
Second Row L-R: Dr. Gregory Brock. Dr. 

Jane Rosenthal. Dr. Thomas Holman. 
Sandra Gill. Wm. Paul Staniszewski. Dr. 
Judith Herr. Dr. Jeanette Coufal. Dr. 
Franklin Fox, Dr. Marybelle Hickner, Dr. 
Marian Marion. Eleanor Johnson, Dr. Gail 
Roerts. Chervl Lowerv. Dr. Janice Keil. 
Third Row L-R: Dr. Karen Zimmerman. Dr. 

John Williams. Dr. Leslie Koepke. 



INDUSTRIAL AND 
MARKETING EDUCATION 

First Row L-R: Dr. Gary Searle, Dr. 
Richard Gebhart. Chairman. Mary Ann 
Lambert. Secretary. Second Row L-R; 
Dean Tabor. Charles Grasch. Dr. Richard 
Peter. Dr. Neal Prichard. Dr. Lee 
Smalley. Dr. Duane Johnson. Dr. Harold 

HalTm. 



INDUSTRIAL 
MANAGEMENT 

First Row L-R: Charles Yost. 

Dr. Willis Valett, Zenon 
Smolarek. Chuck Wallace, Dr. 
Douglas Stallsmiih. Second Row 
L-R: Dr. Raymond Hansen, 
Steven Forster, Dr. Mehar 
Arora, Dr. John Olson. David 
Kraemer. Leo Weaver. Dean 
Long. Dr. Jerry Coomer, 
Chairman. 



78 FACULTY AND STAFF 





MATERIALS 
AND PROCESSES 

First Row L-R: Arnold Piersall. 
Roberl Berkemer. Larry 
Schneider. I>r. Marvin Kufahl, 
George Peltier. Second Row L- 
R: Paul Speidel. Dr. Arthur 
Muller. Chairman, Dr. Henry 
Thomas. Dr. Armand Hofer. Dr. 
FVank Pershem. Dr. James 
Bjomerud. 



MATHEMATICS 

First Row L-R: Marian Ellison. Dr. 
Ruth Mikkelson. Vicki Price. 
Secretary, Dr. Richard Miller. FVank 
Hebl. Second Row L-R: Pamela 
Lipka, Susan Harrison. Naomi 
Decker. Eino Maki. Karen Williams, 
Dr. John Hunt. Chairman. Frank 
Gleeson, Richard Cutts, James Ley. 
Third Row L-R: Fred Breisch, Louis 
Blair. Dr. Donald Johnson. Nasser 
Nadid. Dr. John Nuenfeldt, Clifford 
Gathier. Dr. William McGuire. Dr. 
Dennis Mikkelson. 



MEDIA 

TECHNOLOGY 

First Row L-R: Dr. Roger 
Hartz, Dr. Terrance Ingram. Dr. 
David Graf, Dr. Gordon Jones, 
Dr. Joseph Hagaman, John 
Lauson. Not Pictured: Dr. 
Harry Herbert. Paul 
Staukavich. Joe Jox. Brooke 
Anson, Mary Douley. Philip 
Schwarz. 



FACULTY AND STAFF 



mam 




MUSIC 



First Row L-R; Dr. Patrick Liebergon. 
Dennis Siebenaier. Lynn Prichard. Second 
Row L-R: Roger Anderson. Marie Bolslad. 




PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND ATHLETICS 

First Row L-R: Riia Slinden. Donna Roc. 
Linda Bishop. D. Warren Bowlus. Dr. 
Dwain Mmlz. Second Row L-R: William 
Burns. Judy Ilansmaiin. Harry Wallner. 

J^)hn Zuerleim. 



PHYSICS 

First Row L-R: James Pejsa, Robert 
Foley. Johann McKce. Ellen Carlson. 
Secretary. Second Row L-R: Allan 
Hilgcndorf. Dr. Mark Larchez. Dr. Steve 
Fossum. Chairman. Dr. John Fari.<. 



80 F.^CLLTY AND STAFF 




liii 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



First Row IM: Dayl& 
M^deison, AJ^old Oieon. 
Second Row 1^ ■ Richard 
Tyson. Dr. ThtMn^ 
Nmneman, Chalrinan. X>r. 
David hiix. Lydia RutkowsJd^ 
Diane Cairiveau, Secreta^ 
Dr. WiJlard Bailey, B^ank 
Kenisfitt. Rd>ert Evei^. 
Tha^ Row L-R: Robert 
Meln^. Peder Hainm. Dr. 
Stephen Ssyder. Fourth Row 
h-m Kenneth K^er. 1^. 
Bruce Zlto. Sharon Kera, Dr. 
Beatrice S^cey^ HoeJ 
CrisciK)!a, Dr. Daniel 



SPEECH & FOREIGN 
LANGUAGE 

Firm Rfiw-B-R: i FatltofSke; 
Cbaixniait, Natalie Bothweii 
SchPi^der. June Smetara, 
Secretary. Second Row L-R: 
Howard Heise, Dennis Girffiths^ 
Arthur Matthews. Raymond 
Hayes. Michael Friedman, Gerald 
Hyers; Michael ISfltxilaL 




VOCATIONAL 
REHABILITATl 

Ftest Bow I^R: tk: Thor 
Modahl; Dr. Ifoward 
f^WHiati^. i^fit^ ISiS^ift' 
S^td Row £^E: Billie 
Wolff, Dr. WM^^ Pmk'' 



la each of us exists special quali- 
ties. Some thrive on competition, 
the tbrill of victory as a team, or the 
grueling individual event which re- 
fleets the team. 

As players^ we spend endless 
hours practicing to perfect our parts 
in the brief performance. 

Practice after practice, drill after 
drill, attempt after attempt, condi- 
tioning, being physically and men- 
tally ready . . . 

SPORTS 



The Blue Devil Golf Team: Scott Henke-41.4 ave.. Scott Jackson-41.3 ave., 
Terry O'ReHly-40.1 ave.. Bill Cutter-41.8 ave., Pete Steuerwald-42.0- ave. Let- 
terman: Randy Mayer-39.0 ave., Paul Gandrud-39.6 ave.. Tim Odegard-39.3 
ave., Eric Pierce-39.9 ave., Phil Walsh-42.0 ave. 






GOLF SCOREBOX 




UW-LaCrosse Invite 


6th 


place 


UW-Stevens Point Invite 


10th 


place 


UW-Eau Claire Invite 


9th 


place 


Greater Hiawatha Golf Tourney 


2nd 


place 


UW-Whitewater Collegiate Invite 


7th 


place 


UW-Parkside 


7th 


place 


WSUC Conference Championship 


7th 


place 



GOLF 8! 



WOMEN'S 
VOLLEYBALL 




86 WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL 




VOLLEYBALL 
SCOREBOX 




St. Thomas 


Won 


UW-Eau Claire 


Won 


UW-Superior 


Lost 


UW-Riverfalls 


Won 


UW'Oshkosh 


Lost 


UW-Stevens Point 


Lost 


UW-Eau Claire 


Lost 


UW-Riverfalls 


Lost 


UW-Whitewater 


Lost 


UW-Superior 


Lost 


UW-Whitewater 


Lost 


Carroll 


Lost 


UW-LaCrosse 


Lost 


UW-Milwaukee 


Lost 


Winona 


Lost 


UW-RiverfaUs 


Lost 


Carleion 


Lost 


UW-Platteville 


Lost 


UW-LaCrosse 


Won 




The Blue Devil Women's Vollevbaii Team: Firsl Row L-R: Wendy Morrow. Shari De L^rwcac. Second 
Bow L-R: Mary Blair. Pam Dvorak. Mae Rens. Third Row L-R: Lisa De Larweile. Rila Reiser. Jean 
Saxion. Heather Hagen. Jackie Stapleton. Head Coach - Judy Hansmann. Judy Nelson. Asst. Coach - 
Karen Muleski. 



WOMEN'S VOLLEYBALL « 




The Blue Devil Girl's Tennis Team: Left to Right: Ginger Armstrong. 
Ginny Southard. Lisa Harrison. Lisa Fitterer. Coach Smith. Nancy 
Zedlcr. Jill Garriisen. Amy Griesweil. Donna Sommerfeldt. 



The Blue Devil Men's Tennis Team: Left to Right: Coach Smith. Mark 
Rosvold. Tv CouiUard. Greg Ottum. Pat Bell. Tom Huffel. Second Ron': 
Andy Bjorkund. Lee Couillard. Hob Oertei. Joel Vogler. Larry Chambers. 
Torn Gill man. Scott Rayala. 



Women 's Tennis 
Scorebox 



UW-LaCrosse 


0-9 


UW-Eau Claire 


1-8 


No. Iowa 


1-8 


Central Iowa 


7-2 


St. Ambrose 


1-8 


Carthage College 


5-4 


UW-Stevens Point 


4-5 


Milwaukee 


3-6 


UW-Whitewater Invite 


6th 


Carroll College 


4-5 


Sl Norberts College 


4-5 


UW-Whitewater 


0-9 


UW-Eau Claire 


2-7 


UW-Oshkosh 


1-8 


UW-Riverfalls 


7-2 


U. III. Chicago 


1-8 


DePaul 


1-8 


UW-Eau Claire 


1-8 


WWIAC Conference Tournament 


6th 



Men's Tennis 
Highlights 



7-1 Conference Dual Matches 

Blue Devil Invitational - Won 

NAIA Dis. 14 Tourney Champs 

NCAA Div. Ill National Championships: 

Lee Couillard Participated 
WSUC Tennis Championships: 

Greg Ottum - 4th 

Team - Champions 



FOOTBALL 






FOOTBALL 




SCOREBOX 




Augustana, S.D. 


10- 8 


Crustavus Adolohus 


14- 0 




20-17 


UW- Whitewater 


27-24 


UW'Oshkosh 


23-15 




13- 6 


I7W-La Crosse 


9-17 


C7W-Steve/is Point 


35-28 


Va/7ey City, N.D. 


21- 7 


UW-Eau Claire 


21-24 


UW- River Falls 


7-16 




The Blue Devil Football Team: First Row: Asst. coaches - B. Burns. S. Terry. Head coach B. Kamish: Captains - B. 
Johnson, M. Brills. Asst. coaches - T. Pelrie. L. Kolyza, C. Raykovich. Second Row: Asst coaches - P. Fiever. F. 
Zillner: P. Helm. C Vajgarl. F. Lorensen. P. Young. T. Zimmerman. Asst. coaches - D. Fuller. M. Swoboda. Third 
Row- J Hughes. R. Meysembourg. D. Schara. M. Smoczvk. M. Kraimer. M. Sharkey. J. Velo. M. Ward. R. DesJarlais. 
Fourth Row: D. Gall. D. Lawler. K. Weher. G. Majszak. P. Reed. T. Galiotto. K. Wenzel. C. Kottke. H. Moen. T. 
O'Connor. D. Dohmann. Fifth Row: B. Mvers. J. Longo. B. Debelak. J. Callmann. J. Livingston. T. Mcllguham. M. 
Callahan. J. Hayes, D. Saeger. L. Cross. S. Serrt. Sixth Row: M. Krudwig. R. Sturomski. K. Savre. D. LaPree. S. 
Paidogh. C Huber. D. Grisa. R. Meredith, M. Henning. J. Goodnetter. T. Schuh. J. McDonald. Seventh Row: S. Ball. 
D Caris. B. Dassow. S. Rengstorf. K. Harris. D. Herbison. J. Ferrick. C. Conneli T. Labinsk. D. Cockeram. D. 
Schneider. Eighth Row: T Bargender. D. Geyer. R. Vincini. K. Jurek. J. Stassen. M. Pesonen. D. Pawelkiewicz. B. 
Ness D Hagedorn. Ninth Row: K. Kleman. M. Engebretson. D. Seine. B. Woelfel. C. Coshenet. B. Olsen. G. 
Alvarado. P. Dockstader. D. Cordes. T. Schneeman, M. Miller. D. Pahlaw. S. Niedfeldt. M. Waidoch. D. Weber. D. 
Bittner. G. Harke. 



FOOTBALL 

















A\ .^^^^^^ —^^^m ^^^^^^^^K^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^J^^B^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 




i 


t 


CROSS 
COUNTRY 










i^S/ft ^(r^i^ J^^Hv™ -Sa-^ 


92 


CROSS COUNTRY 






The Blue Devil Cross Country Team: First Row: Margene Toraason. Tim Wright. Jeff Vitali. Sheila Geere. Mike Moher. Webster 
Peterson. Steve Richards, Todd Fox. Kay Rehm. Kathy Niederberger Second Row: Lou Khtzke - Head Coach. Meg Mastilar. 
John Heck. Steve Brooks. Jeff Smith. John Pelishek. Jeff Wachter. Kent Brooks. Mary Sprader - Ist woman runner from Stout in 
a national cross country championship meet, Rita SUnden - AssL Coach, not pictured. Dave Wolff- 1st male runner from Stout to 
make Ail-American in cross country. 





CROSS COUNTRY SCOREBOX 






Women 


Marquette Invitational 










Men 


Stevens Point Invitational 










Women 


TFA/USA Mid-American Collegiate 


5th 


of 


9 


teams 




Championships 


2nd 


of 


4 


teams 


Men 


TRA/USA Mid-American Collegiate 


18th 


of 


23 


teams 




Championships 


13th 


of 


26 


teams 


Women 


St. Olaf Invitational 


7th 


of 


17 


teams 


Men 


St. Olaf Invitational 


4th 


of 


13 


teams 


Women 


Carleton Invitational 


8th 


of 


16 


teams 


Men 


Carleton Invitational 


2nd 


of 


14 


teams 


Women 


Mean Green of River Falls 


1st 


of 


6 


teams 


Men 


Mean Green (J.V. only) 


5th 


of 


7 


teams 


Women 


Bluegold Invitational 


7th 


of 


17 


teams 


Men 


Bluegold Invitational 


2nd 


of 


5 


teams 


Women 


WWIA Conference Cross Country Championships 


6th 


of 


9 


teams 


Men 


Open 


open 








Women 


Open 


open 








Men 


WSU Conference Cross Country Championships 


2nd 


of 


9 


teams 


Women 


NCAA Div. Ill Regional Championships 


5th 


of 


9 


teams 


Men 


Open 


open 








Women 


NCAA Div. Ill National Cross Country 


60th of 120 runners. Mair 


L^t^A dder. 






Championships. Mary Sprader, running as an 


individual runner for Stout 






individual 


8th of 36 teams, Dave Wolff, individual 


Men 


NAIA National Cross Country Championships. 


runner for Stout 








Dave Wolff, running as an individual 











STOUT CROSS COUNTRY « 



MEN'S 
BASKETBALL 





BASKETBALL SCOREBOX 


i rinity 


»y-?6 


Jamestown 




Tournament 


Jna 


Northland College 


60-70 


Viterbo College 


69-68 


Gustavus Adolphus 


CA CO 


UW-La Crosse 


69-84 


C romt 






57-04 




70-58 


isuriii L-GnLrai 




Tournament 


3ra 


Northeastern 


TQ fir J 


Bethel College 




Tournament 


2nd 


oi. iWary 5 college 


oiy-0/ 


UW-iLau Claire 


00-67 


L iv-vv/jueu'ater 


OO-07 


\\ -Flaiteville 


57-55 


UW-La Crosse 


55-75 


U W-Superior 


66-46 


UW-River Falls 


59-49 


UW-St. Point 


40-64 


UW-Oshkosh 


63-51 


UW-River Falls 


62-80 


UW-Eau Claire 


50-51 


UW-Whitewater 


64-88 


UW-Platteville 


64-69 






The Blue Devtl Men's BasketbaU Team: Front Row: Manager - Kathy Pbelan. A$$L Coach 
Dicner. Coach Minlz. Manager ■ Bill Xick Gurki. Second Row: Ken Tyrrell. Randy Merg. 
Darnel! Morris. Pete Hopfensperger. Dave Buelow. Glen Fischer. Third Row: Jamie Angeli. 
Dave Salava. Chuck Dugger. Bill Seller. Dewey Fimreite. Kurt Slellpflug. Fourth Row: 
Greg Koscuik. Jan Johnson. Rick Stephan. Date Nehson. Glen Braessler. Greg Jansen. Nate 
Anderson. 



MEN S BASKETBALL 9: 



% 



WOMEN'S 
BASKET- 
BALL 



WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 





The Blue Devil Girl's Basketball Team: From Row: Karen Heinig. Gina U'Ren. Second Row: Jean Saxton. Gail Rudman. Lori 
Sommer. Mae Rens. Third Row: Kara Quilling. Jeanne Bengslon. Last Row: Jan Maiye. Laura VandcrWegen. Jeanne 
Bengsion. 



WOMEN'S 
BASKETBALL 
SCOREBOX 



St. Thomas 


52-56 


UW-Eau Claire 


79-77 


St. Mary's College 


70-65 


Barron College 
St: Norbert's 


82-49 


64-65 


Gogebic College 


79-64 


Northland College 


67-68 


UW'Superior 


74-75 


Rochester College 


67-69 


A.A.U. 


80-64 


UW-River Falls 


61-85 


UW-Whitewater 


46-96 


UW-Oshkosh 


66-76 


Northland College 


79-74 


UW-St. Point 


61-77 


UW-River Falls 


65-69 


Barron College 


104-49 


Carroll College 


71-86 


Gogebic College 


79-44 


UW-La Crosse 


73-86 


UW-Platteville 


79-60 


UW-Eau Claire 


71-72 




WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 




98 HOCKEY 



HOCKEY SCOREBOX 


UW-Eau Claire 


0-3 


UW-Superior 


7-6 0T 


UW-Superior 


3-9 


A laska-Fairbanks 


1- 6 


Alaska-Fairbanks 


3-8 


Alaska-Anchorage 


1-5 


Alaska-Anchorage 


0-16 


St. Olaf 


2-9 


Lake Forest 


1-6 


Lake Forest 


2- 6 


UW-River Falls 


1- 9 


UW-Stevens Point 


4-5 


UW-Stevens Point 


5- 7 


UW-Eau Claire 


5-6 


UW-River Falls 


0-8 


Mankato State 


2-18 


UW-Eau Claire 


2- 7 


Bethel 


1-6 


UW-Superior 


0-9 


St. Johns 


3-10 


St. Johns 


3- 4 


UW-River Falls 


3-6 


UW-Stevens Point 


4- 1 


UW-Stevens Point 


5-4 


UW-Superior 




Bethel 


3-44 OT 


Lake Forest 


3-13 


Lake Forest 


5-9 





The Blue Devil Hockey Team: Tom Campion, Bill Cutter, John Farr, Phil Field, 
Jim Fischer, Derek Freheim, Richard Holten. Byron Johnson. Todd Kosen, Scott 
Larson, Steve Lavigne, DaleLundeen. Chris Mach, Mike Minneart. SteveNeil, Ned 
Ostenso. Craig Ryan. Tim Samuelson, Scott Steege. Pete Stenerwald, Jim Taylor. 
Don Wilier. 



S THE KEY 
0 WINNING 




The Blue Devil Wrestling Team: First Row: John Podmolik. Terry Gleason, Mike Laverty. Joe Bascher. Jeff Miner. 
Jon Caldwell. Second Row: Chris Coupland. Scot t Howard, Roger Pasca vis. Brain MacDonald. Bob Wahlquisl. Third 
Row: Coach - Ron Weller. Andy Chappa. Bill Can field, Mark Pennsngs. Randy Secrisl. Pat Baker. Dennis Sieberlich. 
Joel Montavlo. Trainer - Randy Pearson. 




WRESTLING SCOREBOX 



UW-La Crosse 
Ausburg 
UW-Eau Claire 
St. Cloud St. Inv. 
Morris 

St. Cloud St Univ. 
Duluth INv. 
UW-Oshkosh 
UW-Superior 



33-12 

14- 30 
31- 9 

5th of 16 teams 

15- 32 
24-25 

4th of 8 teams 

18-33 

43- 3 



St. Thomas 
Loras College 
UW-Platteville 
UW-St. Point 
UW-River Falls 
Duluth 

North Dakota State Univ. 
WSUC Championships 



28-23 
31-11 
11-27 
30-15 
15-34 
20-34 
6-40 
5th of 9 teams 



NCAA Regionals 

Participants: Bob Wahlquist. Scott Howard, Roger Pascals. 
NAIA Nationals 

Participants: Mike Laverty, Bob Wahlquist, Scott Howard. Roger Pas- 
cavis. 



WRESTLING 101 




7 he Blue Dcvil Men > Gymnastics Team: Top photo: Mark Johnson. Todd 
Holii'nd. Marty Franzkouiak. Mark Rezac. Scou Gay. Ron Xairne. Bot- 
tom photo: Mike Beaupre. Paul Spcliz. Ryan Sweenev. Asst. Coach • 
Barry Bian. Head Coach - John Zveriem. 



The Blue Devil Women's Gymnastics Team: Front Row: Asst. Coach - Joi 
Raulh. Asst. Coach - Kay Carter. Lynne Posberg. Karen Rein. Tern Tt 
cyzk. Tammy Dween. Debbie Schnhz. Wendy ChambcrUn. Head Coacf 
John ZucrJein. Second Row: Cheryl Touchetie. Sheila Oberainger. Lisa i 
bos. Janelle Emerson. Third Row: Pam Bariz. Lisa Hille. Pam Fujioka. Jai 
Belongea. 



Mens Gymnastics Highlights 



Individual Highlights 
Broken records this year: 

Paul Speltz-Pomm'el Horse. 9.45 

Ryan Sweeney-Still Rings. 9.20 

Mark Rezal-All Around. 48.30 
National Honors 
NAIA All Americans: 

Paul Speltz 

Mike Beaupre 

Ryan Sweeney 
National NAIA ^Champs: 

Paul SpeltZ'Pommel Horse, 2st 

Mike Beaupre-Pommel Horse. 2nd 

Scott Gay- Vault. 4th 
National NCAA Division II Champs: 

Paul Speltz-Pommel Horse, 1st 

Mike Beaupre-Pommel Horse. 2nd 

Ryan Sweeney-Still Rings, 2nd 
Special Honors: 

Paul Speltz. Mike Beaupre and Ryan Sweeney 
qualified to compete in the NCAA Division 1 
Championships at Penn. State Univ. This was 
the first time any Stout Gymnast has earned this 
honor. 



GirVs Gymnastics Scorebox 



UW-Superior 
UW-River Alls 
Jacksonville. Alabama 
UW-Madison 
UW-La Crosse 
Univ. of Manitoba 
Northern Michigan 
South Dakota 
MinoL ND State 
Sweetheart Inv. 
WWIAC Conference 
NCAA Regionals 



Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
4th place 
6th place 
5th place 



GYMNASTICS 10- 










''a. ^ > 



Tfte 1982-83 Blue Devil Baseball Team: First Row: Jim Miller. Denny Ruff. Tom Armswong. Bill Carlson. Sieve 
Knight. Rick DesJarlais. Pete Joas. Keith Gerneniz. Dan Larson. Second Row: Coach Petrie, Dave Ciske. Tim 
Seichtcr. Mike Carpenter. Edwin Magras. Kevin Weaver. Pat Reed. Duane Ruff Randolph Spencer. Coach Fergu- 
son. Third Row: Chuck Dugger. Dan McConville. Mark Melotte. Jeff K Iocs. Kurt Heffel. Kurt Stellpflug. Randy 
Rubenzer. Ken Faanes. 




BASEBALL 
HIGHLIGHTS 



Conference Record 3 losses 13 wins. 

Season Record 31 losses 26 wins. 

Southern Tiip Results 

Pearl River. Miss. 5 losses 2 wins. 

Gulf Coast. Miss. 1 loss 1 win. 

Will. Carey. Miss. 3 loss 1 win. 
Jackson State. Miss. 2 losses 

NAIA Area IV Tournament 2nd place 

St. Ambrose, Iowa 3- 9 

Moorhead State, Minn. 4- 2 

St. Ambrose. Iowa 6- 5 

William Jewell, Mo. 6- 4 

2-12 



BASEBALL 1C 




■ 



Track Team Photo And Names Not Provided From Athletic Departn 



MEN'S 
TRACK 
RESULTS 

WSUC Outdoor Championship - 3rd 
Scott Raduka - 1st, Pole Vault 
Web Peterson - 1st, 1500m Run 
Paul Loderhose - 110m High Hurdles 

WSUC Indoor Championship - 5th 
Paul Loderhose - 1st, 60 yd, High 

Hurdles 

NAIA Indoor Nationals 

Web Peterson - 4th, Mile Run 
River Falls Invitational -1st 
St. Thomas Triangular -2nd 
Uni Triangular - 3rd 
Don Bremer - 4th 
La Crosse Valentine - 3rd 
Coleman Dual 
Eau Claire Metric - 3rd 




WOMEN'S 

TRACK 
RESULTS 

La Crosse Women 's Quad- 3rd 
La Crosse Valentine- 3rd 
LaCrosse Women's Invite- 7th 
St. Thomas Triangular- 1st 
NAIA Indoor Nationals, MO. 

Kathy Niederberger, 1000 yd. run 

Kay Rehm, Mile run 

Kay Rehm, 2 Mile run 
WWIAC Championship meet 

Kathy Niederberger, 1000 yd. run- 
5th 

Nanci Halvorson, 60 yd. hurdles- 
5th 

Stout Triangular- 1st 

River Falls Invite- 2nd 

Eau Claire Metric- 4th 

V/WIAC Track and Field 

Championships 
Kay Rehm. 10.000 Meter run- 3rd 
Nance Halvorson, 100 Meter 

hurdles- 3rd 
Margene Toraason, 400 Meter dash- 

1st 

Nanci Halvorson. 400 Meter 

hurdles- 6th 
Sue Donnay. Shot put-5th 

NCAA National Meet, III. 
Kay Rehm, 10.000 Meter run 
Kay Rehm. 5.000 Meter run 
Nanci Halvorson, 100 Meter 

hurdles-lOth 







TRACK 




what seemed like a long Journey 
to the outside world turned out to be 
the time of our lives. 

Over the past years we realized 
that there are potential careers oat 
there for us. 

We became acquainted with the 
campus, the different course offer' 
ings, and the majors^ before narrow- 
ing our choices. 

Now we close the door (at least 
temporarily) on our formal educa- 
tion and open the long awaited door 
to our career . . . 



SENIORS 



APPLIED MATH 

- Program Director: Mr. Eino Maki 




Joan M. Hunter Brenda L. Kuivinen Sicvcn J. Larson Karen M. Linke Craig D. Mader David A Marksteiner 

Antigo. Wl Escanaba. WI Plum Ciiy. WI Milwaukee. WI Richfield. MN Neillsville. WI 




Perry L. Martin Brent W. Miller Thomas R. Reinke Dean A. Ruplinger Brian R. Weiler 

fiun Praire. WI Hammond. Wl Menasha. WI Marathon. WI Eau Claire. WI 



ART/ART EDUCATION 

— Program Director: Mr. Ron Verdon 



m SENIORS 




Lynn J. Amlie 
Mankato. MN 



Ronald L. Belz 
Inv. Gro. Hgts.. MN 



Timothy D. Casucci 
Beloit. WI 



Karen K. Deisling 
S. Si. Paui MN 



Cynthia J. 
Falkenhagen 
Kasson. MN 



Gary L. Friedehchs 
Chilton. WI 




Mark R. Gartz 
Brookfield. WI 



Linda L. Gibertson 
Chili. WI 



Christopher R. 

Goodrich 
Madison. WI 



Beth E. Herrild 
Marenette. WI 



Rosemary J. Hrab 
Blaine. MN 



Julie A. Jacobson 
Green Bay. WI 




Brenda K. Jentink 
Cedar Grove. U-7 



Carla J. Kahler 
Paynesville. MN 



Suzanne M. Loaney 
New Hope. MN 



Elizabeth D. Novak 
Janesville. WI 



Todd J. Olson 
Hanska. MN 




Joan R. Richter 
Minneapolis. MN 



Judy A. Stern weii 
Sun Prairie. WI 



Ronald A. Theis 
St. Peter. MN 



Lisa A. Trachte 
Wonewoc. WI 



Brad E. Trostud 
Arlington Hgts.. IL 



Ann L. Radler 
Brookfield. WI 



Kristine M. Winnie 
Green Bay. WI 



CHILD DEVELOPMENT & FAMILY 

I FTTFT ~ Program Director: Dr. Priscilla 

M^MMT A2j Resting 



SENIORS 111 




Ann F. Bates 
Chetek. WI 



Margaret F. 
Cousineau 
Wayzata. MN 



Mary Jane Fenske Janice Knudtson 
Pi. Edwards. WI Fall Creek. WI 



Caren J. Frank 
Mequon. WI 



Brenda R. Frembgen 

Lewis. WI 




Lois J. Linse 
Fall Creek. WI 



Arlene C. Malotky 
CiintonviUe. WI 



Julie L. Rantala Donna K. Roinila Roberta A. Sisinni Lori A. Stapelkamp 

Iron River. WI Prentice. WI Inv. Gro. Hghts.. MN Cedar Grove. WI 




w — 



Brenda K. Sioll 
Osseo. WI 



Judy E. Thomas 
Durand. WI 



Lori A. Wren 

Mound. MX 



CLOTHING, TEXTILES & DESIGN 

— Program Director: Mrs. Glenyce Peterson 




Vicky R. Bohne 
Two Rivers. WI 



Linda L. Cantrell 
Kenosha. WI 



Dianne C. Clement 
Trinidad. Tobago 



Beatrice H. Doll 
New Hope. MN 



Connie L. Feirn 
Janesville. WI 



Dawn M. Francis 
S. St. Paul. MN 



112 SENIORS 



Vicki L. Hultner Bernadette Joseph 
Minneionka. MN Thnidad. Tabago 




Cheryl L. Lenlz 
River Falls. WI 




Margaret M. Mastalir Merrie J. McGraih 
Casco. WI Minocqua. WI 



Pamela G. Meyer 
Gay lord. MN 




Jane M. Robinson 
Prentice. WI 



Jane C. Scharmach 
Greendale. WI 




Jean M. Sendelbach 
Madison, WI 



Colleen P. Simertz 
New Hope. MN 



Nancy K. Sjoblom 
Coon Rapids. MN 



Julie A. Smith 
Minneionka, MN 




Grace M. Spillane Laura K. Wachter Jennifer L. Yess 
South wick. MA St. Paul. MN W. St. Paul. MN 



Cheryl J. Zeren 
Forest Lake. MN 



DIETETICS 



— Program Director: Mr. Thomas Phillips 




Heidi A. Abts 
Fountain Oty. WI 



Kimberly R. Arnevik Jeanne M. Barsamian 
Rice Lake. WI S. Milsaukee. WI 



Melanie L. Block 
Burnsville. MN 



Moseley F. Bronkalla 
Warrens. WI 



Linda S. Dragomir 
Alliance. OH 



SENIORS 1 




Amy J. Fleiner 
Austin. MN 



Can A. Fowler 
Redwood Fails. MN 



Laurie K. HUden 
Baldwin. WI 



Don P. Hawarth 
Medford. WI 



Mollie R. Hughes 
Chatfield. MN 



Ann M. Jelle 
Bricelyn. MN 




Nancy Y. Under 
WUimar, MN 



Suzanne J. Martin 
River Falls. WI 



Mary J. McDonald 
Grand Rapids. MN 



Amy J. McLaughlin 
Waukesha. WI 



Sharon R. Meyer 
Melrose. WI 



Nancy L. Peterson 
CurUs. WI 




Donna M. Schulist 
Cluster. WI 



Cindy L. Soda 
Princeton. WI 



Sarah A. Turner 
Garden Prairi. IL 



Catherine A. Vos 
Duluth. MN 



Laurie C. Williams 
Hoyt Lakes. MN 



Anne E. Wiilger 
Rice Lake. WI 



EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

— Program Director: Dr. Pricilla Resting 




Karyl L. Adock 
Menomonie. WI 



Christine C Berry 
Plover. WI 



Barbara A. Boyer 
Minnetonka. MN 




Brenda C. Doering 
Olivia. MN 



Karen J. Dybul 
Milwaukee. WI 



.4 



Lynn M. Dymanyk 
New Brighton. MN 



114 SENIORS 




Lisa B. German 
Viroqua. WI 



Monica L. Herrera 
Si. Anthony. MN 



Brenda S. Huis 
Menomonie. WI 



Jacki R. Jensen 
Eagan. MN 



Janet J. Jensen 
Frederic. WI 



Debra H. Johnson 
Viroqua. WI 




Karin R. Johnson 
Chisago City. MN 



Caroline R. Lawrence 
Crystal. MN 



Jeaneiie M. Lepore 
NE Mineapolis. MN 



Laura B. Love 
Thiensville. WI 



Vicki A. McCracken 
JanesviUe. WI 



Margaret M. McGuire 
Bloomingion, MN 




Mary L. Musil 
Sheboygan. WI 



Lisa OhJand 
MN 



Jeanne K. Styczinski 
Menomonie, WI 



Gloria J. Thoma 
NeiUsvUie. WI 



Lisa A. Wirtanen 
Verona. WI 



FASHION MERCHANDISING 



— Program Director: Dr. Mary Welch 




Constance D. Aiello 
Racine. WI 



Sharon A. Brault 
Manitowoc. WI 



Constance M. 

Campion 
Cedarhurg. WI 



Elizabeth G. 

Courtney 
Lavalie. WI 



Michelle Demauer 
Pipe. WI 



Becky M. Froiland 
Colfax. WI 



SENIORS n 



Joan M. Gallucci 
Des Plaines. IL 



Pamela A. Hartel 
SulUvan. WI 



Tracy L. Hoeft 
Oshkosh. WI 



Karen S. Huber 
Le Center. MN 




Micbele M. Kilinski 
Wausau. WI 



Holii J. Krueger 
Mosinee. WI 



Julie M. Onderak 
Beioit. WI 



Monica A. King 
Marathon, WI 



Cynthia L. Kinn 
Nekoosa, WI 



Karen K. Knoll 
Menomonie. WI 



Peggy R. Johnson 
Cannon Falls. MN 



4 



Brenda L. Kopas 
Cedarbwg. WI 



Trudy J. Johnson 
Eau Claire. WI 




Cynthia R. Krueger 
Merrill. WI 




Karen L. Lacek Diane D. Lake Jannet M. Lunquist Pamela A. Newcombe Teri L. Olson 

Mercer. WI Park Ridge. IL Rockford. IL Edina. MN Stillwater. MN 




Carolyn Papanek 
IL 



Wendy K. Peterson 
Minneapolis. MN 



Mary K. Pilon 
Sheboygan. WI 




Debra S. Rass 
Luxemburg. WI 



Diane F. Reilly 
Ripon. WI 




Sharon K. Shaw 
Kohler. WI 



Lyndelle Skoglund 
Mound. MN 



Yvonne M. Smith 
New Haven. 10 



Jami J. Stapelmann 
Eau Claire. WI 



Geralynn M. Thelen Kathleen A. Websiei 
East Troy. WI Minneapolis. MN 



116 SENIORS 




Jane M. Williams 
MN 



FOOD SERVICE ADMINISTRATION 



— Program Director: Mr. Thomas Phillips 







* 

J- A 


Robin R. Hoyun, 
Westby. WI 


Linda K. Schmidt 
Plain. WI 




GENERAL BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION ~ ca^S,"- 




Saundra S. Anderson C. Scott Bailey 
Waukesha. WI Unolakes. MN 



Marie F. Balow 
Stanley. WI 




Peggy A. Bolton 
Menomonie. WJ 



Tracey J. Brixius 
Brooklyn Center. MN 



Kevm D. Carlson 
Cbetek. WI 



SENIORS 



Theresa A. Doll 
Fond cfu lac. WI 



Mary L. Dunlap 
Rochester, MN 



Michelle A. Freddick 
Waukee. lA 



David O. Haben 
Edina. MN 



Sara A. Haessly 
Marshfield. WI 



Jann T. Herzog 
Elk River, WI 




Chariene L. Holt 
Rochester. MN 



Michael B. Hoover Edward D. Hribar 
Ridgeland. WI Edina. WI 



Alan H. Ikeler 
Hales Corners. WI 



Juan M. Jaquez 
Beaver Dam. WI 



Diane E. Just 
Stillwater. MN 




Anne C. Koop 
New Richmond. WI 



Diana B. Knutson 
Bloominglon. MN 



Jennifer L. Knutson 
Crystal. MN 



Jamil A. Krueger Margaret M. Lacenski Joni L. Lenius 
Antigo. WI New Berlin. WI Watertown. WI 




Beth A. Lather 
Zumbrota. MN 



Judy L. Mainz 
Oconomowoc. WI 



Sheila E. Maloney 
Arcadia. WI 



John E. Mcllquham Clifford J. McNamara Bradley R. Meyer 
Chippewa Falls. WI St. Paul. MN Richfield. MN 




Lee V. Mollan 
Richfield. MN 



Colin J. Moore 
Monona. WI 



Sharon L. Mork 
Menomonie. WI 



Joseph A. 
Muehlbauer 
Praire Du Ch.. WI 



Patrick J. Murphy 
Neenah. WI 



Susan M. Nelson 
Arcadia. WI 



118 SENIORS 



David D. Newstrom 
Crystal. MN 



Brian A. Niehavse 
Marshfield. WJ 



David J. Norwood 
Menomonee Falls. WJ 



Leu A. O'Leary 
Manitowoc. WI 



Laurence R. Peck 
Lake Geneva. WI 



Jay C. Prairie 
Fridley. MN 




Darcey A. Quist 
Osceola, WI 



Lisa M. Reichert 
Sheboygan. WI 



km 



Teresa M. Rickel 
Newport. MN 



Mary K. Schiller 
Sparta, MN 




Luann M. Schoenborn 
Brookfield. WI 



Robert E. Schams 
Bel Air. MA 




Frances M. Skibba 
Cudaby. WI 



Jill R. Stensland 
Austin, MN 



Candy Tavassole 
Menomonie. WI 



Jill L. Thompson 
Baldwin. WI 



Susan M. Unrath 
Milwaukee. WI 




Rebecca L. 
Wagenknecht 
Oakfield. WI 



Wendy L. Wagner 
Oswego. IL 



Bradley D. Wallen 
Rochester. MN 



Gregory P. Weber 
Eau Claire. WI 



Timothy L. Wells 
Nekoosa. WI 



Scott E. Wheeler 
Menomonie. WI 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

— Program Director: Miss Joy Jocelyn 



SENIORS 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 

— Program Director: Miss Joy Jocelyn 




Nancy G. Beestman 
Clayton. WI 



Elizabeth A. Bruni 
West Bend. WI 



Carol E. Cook 
St. Charles. MN 



Tammy L. Dineen 
Manitowoc. WI 



Doran M. Doan 
Berlin. WI 



Barbara M. Dopp 
Randolph. MN 




Margaret M. Dunne 
Bioomington. MN 



Susan M. Fox 
Elk Mound. WI 



Debra L. Fuhr 
SUllwater. MN 



Connie L. Gronlund 
Duluth. MN 



Ann M. Hallada 
Appleton. WI 



Veda M. Hansen 
Winter. WI 




Jeanetie S. Holz 
Buffalo Grove, IL 



Lori A. Jauch 
Milwaukee. WI 



Robin K. King 
Berlin. WI 



Lori J. Kolberg 
Red Wing. MN 



Brenda J. Kornaus 
Green Bay. WI 



Viciona J. Kunz 
Iron Ridge. WI 




Linda A. Larsen 
Green Bay. WI 



Barbara J. Malo 
Hanock. MN 



Kathleen L. Martin 
Whitewater. WI 



Ruth M. Navrestad 
Westly. WI 



Kathryn M. Oabeson 
Merrillan. WI 



Laura L. Fallen 
Hayward. WI 



120 SENIORS 




Vick, L Peterson Kathleen A. Phelan Wendy L. Poehlman Deborah K. Ryman Pamela F. Schwaru Susan M. Thompson 
Sheboygan Falls. WI DePere. WI New London, WI Anoba. MN BnUion. WI Elmwood. Wl 




Constance J. Winter 
Mt. Horeb. WI 



Claudette Wray 
Kingston. Jamaica 



HOME ECONOMICS IN BUSINESS 

- Program Director: Dr. Mary Thompson 




Lori A. Belke 
Stratford. WI 



Jill R. Duren 
Greenfield. WI 



Ann E. Egenberger 
Plymouth. MN 




Pamela L. Hanke 
Dela van. WI 



Susan A. Jochims 
Minnetonka. MN 



Sandra L. Johnson 
Turtle Lake. WI 




Grace M. Kasel 
Sl Paul. MiV 



Renee M. KohJnhofer 
Greenwood, WI 



Mary J. Kucera 
Sl Paul. MN 



Jaqueline E. 
Lazansky 
Kewaunee. WI 



Cheryl R. Miller 
Brooklyn Park. MN 



Lorrie J. Nielsen 
New Hope. MN 



SENIORS 1 




#4 




Barbara K. Sachse 
Mequon, WI 



Cheryl A. Sampson 
Red Wing, MN 



Gretchen M. Schuck 
Janesville, WI 



Sabra L. Sommer 
New London. WJ 



Virginia M. Southard 
Frederic, WI 




Jill A. Westervelt 
Milwaukee, WI 



Rosemary A. Wolf 
Elm wood, WI 



Lisa M. VanLaanen 
DePere, Wi 



Laura K. Yahr 
CedarbuTg, WI 



HOTEL AND RESTAURANT 

— Program Director: James Burgermeister 



4 




Rodger A. Beyer 
Marinette, WI 



David J. Blouin 
Clarendon Hills, IL 



Scott A. Campbell 
Red Lake Falls, MN 



Kirk D. Carson 
OnaJaska, WI 



James M. Dolezel 
LaCrosse, WI 



Robert Ekman 
Menomonie, WI 




Telly S. Fatsis 
Madison, WI 



Terry A. Feil 
Randolph, WI 



Christina M. Fueist 
Glenview, IL 



Steve C. Gertenback 
Green Bay, WI 



Carl A. Granberg 
CO 



Barbara J. Griffin 
Viroqua, WI 



2 SENIORS 




Ann D. Hendricks 
Lvere. Kwara 



David C. Herrild 
Marinette. WI 



Debra L. Helenske Lisa M. Impagliazzo 
South Milwaukee. WI Bloomington. MN 



Daniel A. Jaehn 
Wise. Rapids. WI 



Terri L. Jansen 
Ridoll. IL 




Robert J. Jensch 
Zumbrota. MN 



Toni L. Jensen 
Westby. WI 



Bradley D. Koivu 
Prior Lake. MN 



Brian Lamers 
DePere. WI 





Garret D. Larson 
Richfield. MN 



Timothy R, Leroy 
New Berlin. WI 




Kevin D. Lysdahl 
Granlsburg. WI 




Marilynn F. Mann 
Wise. Delis. WI 



4 



Mary L. Matthees Gretchen A. Mayer Julie S. Merera 
South Haven. MN Walertown. MN Boscobel. WI 



Linda M. Nannemann 
New Berlin. WI 




Sheryl A. Nemetz 
Shawano. WI 



Cindi L Oliver Clarence W. Peterson Webster E. Peterson 
Stevens Point. WI Dallas. WI New Hope. MN 



Richard N. Piper Monica A. Plummer 
Kailva-Kona. HI Oregon. WI 





Robert P. Reil 
Granion. WI 



Louis R. Reinert 
Arlington. IL 



William C Rouman 
Elm Grove. WI 



David L. Sheedy 
Green Bay. WI 



Carolyn L. Simpson 
Brodhead. WI 



Timothy M. Smith 
Clarendon Hills. IL 

SENIORS 





INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

— Program Director: Dr. Leonard Sterry 




Adewale B. Adeoye Jeffrey A. Allram Donald H. Anderson Abiodun. Awojide James P. Azzalino Thomas .V. Beck 
Nigeria Ridgeland. WI Bayfield. WI Ikire. Nigeria Milwaukee. WI Howards Grove. WI 




Terrence R. Brown Desmond 0. Dowdie Brian J. Finder Musa B. Gajere Craig W. Haupt Mohamaed Y. 

Waukesha. WI St. Elizabeth. Jamaca Menomonie. WI Kano. Kano Stale Hales Corners. WI Ibrahim 

Kano. Kano Stale 



124 SENIORS 



Gary A. Krahn 
Greendale. WI 




Patrick J. Leppla 
West Bend. WI 



Mark A. Lessman 
White Bear Lake. 



Mary M. Marin 
Sturgeon Bay. WJ 



Stephen T. Nelson J/^^^ ^- Schiveder 
Fond Du Lac. WI Bloommgton Praire. 




Ron V. Sielaff 
Chippewa Falls. WI 



David J. Stone 
Janesville. WI 



David A. Thompson 
Stone Harbor. NJ 



David L. 
Waldenberger 
Ridgeland. WI 



Mark C. Winiecki 
Green Bay. WI 



David P. Wood 
Two Rivers. WI 



INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY 

— Program Director: Mr. Ned Weckmueller 




Randall L. Abendioih 
Appleton. WI 



Dean V. Amundson 
Menomonie. WI 





Keith J. Anderson 
Grantsburg. WI 



James E. Baraboo 
Wausaw. WI 



Gary A. Bernier 
Grandview. WI 



Shelby K. Blalock 
Menomonie, WI 




Michael W. Block 
Tigerton. WI 



David R. Bogenhagen 
Merrill, WI 



Steven R. Bolton 
Wise. Rapids. WI 



Robert P. Budnik 
Manitowoc, WI 



Bradley Bursch 
Somerset. WI 



Mark K. Byer 
Rochester. MN 



SENIORS 1 




Daniel D. Casper 
Sheboygan. WI 



Brian C. Castle 
Anoka. MN 



Timothy R. 
Christopherson 
Madison. WI 



Stephen M. Crane 
Menomonie. WI 



John R. Danen 
DePere. WI 




Lynn M. Dolezel 
Wise. Rapids. WI 



Daniel A. Drake 
Dickenson. ND 



Terrv A. Dvorak 
Edgar. WI 



Gary N. EasUund 
St. Paul. MN 



Daniel A. Eke 
Dunneli. MN 





Jeffrey S. Erickson 
Oneida. WI 



Mark A. Erickson 
New Richmond. WI 



Richard A. Em 
Rhinelander. WI 



Bijan A. Estandarani James G. Fitzpatrick 
Menomonie. WI Bayard. 10 




Frances W. Folwer 
Aurora. IL 




Mark J. Griffith 
West Bend. WI 



Marshall J. Frey 
Medford. WI 



Robert J. Guarnaccio 
Northbrook. IL 



Anthony A. Gaskin 
Trinidad. Tobago 



Patrick A. Gove 
Pound. WI 




Paul C. Gundrum 
Hales Corner. WI 



Donald J. Haines 
Green Bay. WI 



Michael E. Grady 
St. Paul Park. MN 



Brent H. Hallgren 
Medford. WI 



I2fe SENIORS 




David C. Hartlip Marilyn R. Heckley 
Byron, MS Si. Paul MN 



Vincent H. 
New London. Wl Minnea^i^MN 



John F. Hoffman 



Ronald L. Home 



James E. Jordan 
Milwaukee. WI 




Clive C. Kentish 
Kingston. Jamaica 



Craig J Kuhl 
Richfield. MN 



Claudia A. Knowlton 
Austin. MN 



James S. Kolodzne 
Jefferson. WI 



Robert Komro 
Durand. WI 



Rick J. Konecke 
West Bend. WI 



Curtis A. Kuecker 
Caledonia. MN 




Robert John LaBore 
St. Paul. MN 



Steven W. Larson 
Grove Gty. MN 



Larry J. Lendl 
Rice Lake. WI 



Gregory J. Lengell Debbie K. Leighton 
South Milwaukee. WI Kasson. MN 




Kevin A. Kipsky 
River Falls. WI 



1 



Brian K. Lyngaas 
Jefferson. WI 





Michael R. Malzahn 
Manitowoc. WI 



Paul M. Marsolek 
Milwaukee. WI 



Andrew J. Martin 
Milwaukee. WI 



John R. Martusinec 
St. Francis. WI 




Randy A. Messner Daniel J. Mikulecky Mark T. Miller 
Sheboygan Falls. WI Oconomowoc. WI Oshkosk. WI 



Gregory T. Mischo 
Rothschild. WI 



Mark J. Misorski 
Hales Corner. WI 



Sieve G. Nuskiewiczs 
Green Bay. WI 



SENIORS 12: 



Jon D. Oakland 
Jeffers. MN 





Duglas P. Oslund 
St. Paul, MN 




William A. Osmer 
Stevens Point. WI 



^^^^^^ 



John S. Pattison 
Durand. WI 



Scott E. Penfield 
Madison. WI 



Steven G. Perry 
Minneapolis, MN 




Andrew M. Pershern 
Menomonie. WI 



Christopher R. 

Peterson 
New Hope. MN 



Jackson A. 
Rabedeaux 
Eau Claire. WI 



Paul T. Schmidt 
Neenah. WI 



Paul W. Schmidt 
St. Paui. MN 



Ross W. Schroedei 
Rochester. MN 




Jeffrey T. Schuh Greg A. Sherwood 
Kaukauna, WI Mankato. WI 



Clyde W. Shields Edward L. Sitbiewicz Jeffery A. Skogen Phillip E. Smith 
Madison. WI Eagle River. WI Rio. WI Eau Claire. WI 




Lori A. Sommer 
West Allis. WI 



Bradley A. Storm 
Eau Claire, WI 



Steven J. Strand 
West Bend. WI 



John F. Strike 
Kenosha. WI 



David E. Tadsen 
Chaska. MN 



Kristyn R. Ticker 
Medford. WI 





John D. Tio 
St. Paul. MN 



Mark A. Toline 
Moline. IL 



Terry L. Tschetter Steven P. Vandewalle Thomas VanHandel Joseph M. Vaudreu. 
Brookfield. WI Shawano. WI Rhinelander. WI Eau Claire. WI 



128 SENIORS 




John M. Voegele 
Cambridge. MN 




Joel N. Walde 
Eleva. Wl 



Randal L. 

Warricbaiet 
Hixton. WI 



Greg N. Wasielewski Michael R. Wegener 
Polaski. WI Pittsburgh. PA 



Jeffrey A. Wick 
New Berlin. WI 



Gregg T. Wohlers 
Stillwater. MN 




Tod R. Zimmerman 

Cedarbure. WI 



MARKETING & DISTRIBUTIVE 

EDUCATION . _ Program Director: Dr. Gary Searle 





Gregory L. BlBir non,^ E. Oacjura '(^fj^^, gi^^' 

Superior. U/ iVj>t, Rapids. \M 



Jill R. Hogdahl Abiodun R. Seriki 

Wcnn'.-orth. U7 \feno.'nonic. Wl 



StellaPaul Woji 
Port Harcourt. 
Nigeria 




PSYCHOLOGY 



— Program Director: Mr. Paul Fen ton 



SENIORS 12 



Ernesl W. Brown 
Luck. Wl 



Lee A. Erickson 
Eau Claire. WI 



Brian P. Ewing 
Spring Valley. Wl 



Jodi B. Goodel] 
BoyceviUe. Wl 



Sharon L. Janot 
Racine, Wl 



Catherine S. Karnst 
Cedarburg. Wl 




Robin L. LaFrontaine Mohamad Nahrawi Mohamed T. Nahrawi 
Waukesha. Wl Sarawak. Malaysia Sarawak. Malaysia 



Cheryl L. Peters 
Menomonie. Wl 



Job J. Shande 
Nigeria 



Nina Stem 
Madison. Wl 



VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 



- Program Director: Dr. David Corthell 




Elizabeth J. Cole 
Bayport. MN 



Brian J. Jablick 
Racine. Wl 



Gloria G. James 
Tnnidad. Tabago 



Roberta S. King 
Spooner. Wl 





Paul R. Nelson 
Sturgeon Bay 



Roger C. Peblke 
Chippewa Falls. Wl 



Wallace J. Quist 
Ellsworth. Wl 



Mary S. Shepherd 
Rhinelander. Wl 



Lynda J. Lendl 
Rice Lake. Wl 



Juliann M. Simon 
New Richmond. Wl 



Vicki L. Mack 
Eau Claire. Wl 




Mary J- Wittman 
si. Paul. MN 



130 SENIORS 



VOCATIONAL, TRADE, & INDUST. 
ED. 

— Program Director: Dr. Neal Prichard 






James O. Aderonmu ^d^^^d p. Bekibele Lebsa Bernard Muhammadu G. Bm Jamp.< M. .Inrd^r 



Ogbomoso. Oyo-Siaie 



Brendal Stale. 
Nigeria 



Kaduna. Nigeria Gashua. Nigeria 



Cedarburg, WI 




James J. Rahaman Ganiyu A. Raji Kmgsley Sowande TatS^AkI°Eenu} 

Menomonie, Wl Nigeria Nigeria '^la'tc 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 

- Program Directors: Dr. C. Gilbertson, Dr. M. Arora, Dr. J. Olson 




Lola Clarke Theodore J. Lloyd Marceimo Vazauez 

Kingston. Jamaica Cumberland. WI Richfield. MN 

Guidance & Management Technology Industrial Safiy 
Counciling 




SENIORS 131 



1983 TOWER YEARBOOK STAF] 





Staff Members L-R: Cindy Schopp, David Rhinevaull, Elizabeth Nord, Michael Turek 
and Gary Dineen. 

EDITORS NOTE: 

We have come a long way since August of 1982. Some have brushed up their typing 
skills and design techniques and have mastered 3R's. 3C's, copy keys and croppers. 
While others have perfected the art of photography, developing and printing skills. 

No one said that creating a yearbook was an easy task. Only those who have 
experienced it can understand ail of the details that have gone into producing each 
page of the Tower. 

I would like to extend a warm thank you to the dedicated 1983 Tower Staff. Our book 
is a product to be proud of! 

Elizabeth M. Nord 
Editor-in-Chief 

WELCOME: Howard Foreman the new Tower Yearbook Advisor. 

SPECIAL THANKS TO: 

David Goheen of Goheen Studio's for photographing the 1983 seniors. 

Marty Springer for photographing the faculty. 

Bill Siedlecki for guiding us when help was needed. 

Diane Hjelter for the encouragement and support in all of our business affairs. 
Jane Murphy for sharing her creative writing skills. 

Ron Kresel for all of his hard work and faith in the 1983 Tower Staff. We could not hav€ 
done it without you!